Low frequency of liver enzyme elevation in HIV-infected patients attending a large urban treatment centre in Uganda

P. Ocama, B. Castelnuovo, M. R. Kamya, G. D. Kirk, S. J. Reynolds, A. Kiragga, R. Colebunders, D. L. Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Liver enzyme elevations among patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) were determined by prospectively evaluating aspartate aminotransferase (AST) data in a cohort of patients in Kampala over 36 months. A proportion of patients had hepatitis B virus (HBV) status determined. Hepatotoxicity was graded I to IV according to the AIDS Clinical Trial Group criteria. Of 546 patients, 377 (69%) were women; overall median baseline CD4+ T-cell was 97/μL (interquartile range [IQR] 20-164). Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was detected in 42 (9%) of 470 persons. ART included lamivudine, with either nevirapine and d4T (74%) or efavirenz and AZT (26%). Median (IQR) AST level at baseline was 35 (27, 53 IU/L). Over 36 months, only eight patients had grade III AST elevation. Neither HBsAg nor ART regimen influenced AST levels. Male gender and CD4+ change from baseline were correlated with AST elevation. Patients with HIV/HBV co-infection were not at an increased risk of AST elevation, which occurred uncommonly in this setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)553-557
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of STD and AIDS
Volume21
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2010

Keywords

  • AST
  • Antiretroviral therapy
  • Liver toxicity
  • Nevirapine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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