Low dose cervical CT myelography. How acceptable are adverse effects at this juncture?

H. Wang, A. E. Rosenbaum, M. L. Updike, A. J. Kumar, Simion J Zinreich, Hyo S Ahn, W. S. Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

When cervical myelography is required, the highest incidence of adverse effects usually supervenes. These effects are particularly important in patients with metastatic disease, post-cervical trauma and out-patients. Low dose hydrosoluble CT myelography imaging (300-500 mg I, total dose) can be accomplished by injecting the contrast medium when the patient is in the CT scanner via C1-2 puncture with a small needle (e.g. 25 gauge). Our method of accomplishing this was to use C-arm fluoroscopy performed with the patient either supine or prone and to transfer the patient with the needle in situ to the scanner. This was done with the patient on a portable exchangeable CT table top. Remarkably few adverse effects (transient mild headache in 2 of 22 patients) would appear to render this technique safe and useful.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)539-541
Number of pages3
JournalActa Radiologica, Supplement
Volume369
StatePublished - 1986

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Myelography
Needles
Patient Transfer
Fluoroscopy
Punctures
Contrast Media
Headache
Outpatients
Incidence
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Low dose cervical CT myelography. How acceptable are adverse effects at this juncture? / Wang, H.; Rosenbaum, A. E.; Updike, M. L.; Kumar, A. J.; Zinreich, Simion J; Ahn, Hyo S; Kim, W. S.

In: Acta Radiologica, Supplement, Vol. 369, 1986, p. 539-541.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, H. ; Rosenbaum, A. E. ; Updike, M. L. ; Kumar, A. J. ; Zinreich, Simion J ; Ahn, Hyo S ; Kim, W. S. / Low dose cervical CT myelography. How acceptable are adverse effects at this juncture?. In: Acta Radiologica, Supplement. 1986 ; Vol. 369. pp. 539-541.
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