Low dopamine D5 receptor density in hippocampus in an animal model of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

T. Medin, J. E. Rinholm, S. G. Owe, T. Sagvolden, A. Gjedde, J. Storm-Mathisen, L. H. Bergersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A state of low dopaminergic activity has been implicated in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The clinical symptoms of ADHD include inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity, as well as impaired learning; dopaminergic modulation of the functions in the hippocampus is important to both learning and memory. To determine dopamine receptor (DR) density in a well-established animal model for ADHD, we quantified the dopamine D5 receptors in the hippocampus in the spontaneously hypertensive rat. We used immunofluorescence microscopy and immunogold electron microscopy to quantify the dopamine D5 receptor density on CA1 pyramidal cell somas and dendrites and dendritic spines in the stratum radiatum and stratum oriens. The density of the dopamine D5 receptors was significantly lower in the cytoplasm of pyramidal cell somas in the spontaneously hypertensive rat compared to the control, indicating a reduced reservoir for insertion of receptors into the plasma membrane. DRs are important for long-term potentiation and long-term depression, hence the deficit may contribute to the learning difficulties in individuals with the diagnosis of ADHD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11-20
Number of pages10
JournalNeuroscience
Volume242
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 9 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dopamine D5 Receptors
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Hippocampus
Animal Models
Pyramidal Cells
Learning
Carisoprodol
Inbred SHR Rats
Dendritic Spines
Impulsive Behavior
Long-Term Potentiation
Dopamine Receptors
Dendrites
Fluorescence Microscopy
Electron Microscopy
Cytoplasm
Cell Membrane
Depression

Keywords

  • ADHD
  • Dopamine
  • Electron microscopy
  • Quantitative immunogold
  • Stratum oriens
  • Stratum radiatum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Medin, T., Rinholm, J. E., Owe, S. G., Sagvolden, T., Gjedde, A., Storm-Mathisen, J., & Bergersen, L. H. (2013). Low dopamine D5 receptor density in hippocampus in an animal model of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Neuroscience, 242, 11-20. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroscience.2013.03.036

Low dopamine D5 receptor density in hippocampus in an animal model of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). / Medin, T.; Rinholm, J. E.; Owe, S. G.; Sagvolden, T.; Gjedde, A.; Storm-Mathisen, J.; Bergersen, L. H.

In: Neuroscience, Vol. 242, 09.07.2013, p. 11-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Medin, T, Rinholm, JE, Owe, SG, Sagvolden, T, Gjedde, A, Storm-Mathisen, J & Bergersen, LH 2013, 'Low dopamine D5 receptor density in hippocampus in an animal model of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)', Neuroscience, vol. 242, pp. 11-20. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroscience.2013.03.036
Medin, T. ; Rinholm, J. E. ; Owe, S. G. ; Sagvolden, T. ; Gjedde, A. ; Storm-Mathisen, J. ; Bergersen, L. H. / Low dopamine D5 receptor density in hippocampus in an animal model of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In: Neuroscience. 2013 ; Vol. 242. pp. 11-20.
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