Low dietary fiber and high protein intakes associated with newly diagnosed diabetes in a remote aboriginal community

Thomas M.S. Wolever, Safa Hamad, Joel Gittelsohn, Joe Gao, Anthony J.G. Hanley, Stewart B. Harris, Bernard Zinman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The high prevalence of diabetes mellitus in North American aboriginal populations may be due to recent changes in lifestyle, including the adoption of a high-fat, low-fiber diet. To determine whether fat or fiber intakes were associated with new cases of diabetes, we studied 72% (728/1018) of residents aged > 9 y from a remote aboriginal community in northern Ontario using the 75-g oral-glucose-tolerance test and 24-h dietary recall. The mean fat intake of this population (36% of energy) was typical for North America, but faber intake (1.2 g/MJ) was very low. Logistic-regression analysis, adjusted for age, sex, and body mass index, showed that a 1-SD increase in faber intake reduced the risk of having diabetes by 39% (P = 0.026) whereas the same increase in protein intake increased the risk by 38% (P = 0.027). There was no significant effect of energy, fat, starch, or simple sugars. These data support Trowell's original dietary-fiber hypothesis that '... dietary fiber depleted starchy foods are conducive to the development of diabetes mellitus in susceptible human genotypes'.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1470-1474
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume66
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997

Keywords

  • Amerindians
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Dietary fiber
  • Ontario
  • Protein
  • Sandy Lake Health and Diabetes Project

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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