Low Birthweight, Retention in HIV Care, and Adherence to ART Among Postpartum Women Living with HIV in Ghana

Kwame S. Sakyi, Margaret Y. Lartey, Julie A. Dension, Caitlin E. Kennedy, Luke C. Mullany, Prince G. Owusu, Awewura Kwara, Pamela J. Surkan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Care for low birthweight (LBW) infants can contribute to psychological difficulties and stigma among mothers living with HIV, creating challenges for antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and retention in HIV care. We explored how caring for LBW infants affects maternal ART adherence and retention in care. We conducted 30 in-depth interviews with postpartum women living with HIV in Accra, Ghana: 15 with LBW infants and 15 with normal birthweight (NBW) infants. Compared to mothers with NBW infants, mothers with LBW infants described how caring for their newborns led to increased caregiver burden, prolonged hospital stays, and stigma—contributing to incomplete ART adherence and missed clinical appointments. For a few women, care for LBW infants created opportunities for re-engagement in HIV care and motivation to adhere to ART. Results suggest women living with HIV and LBW babies in Ghana face increased challenges that impact their adherence to care and ART.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)433-444
Number of pages12
JournalAIDS and behavior
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 15 2019

Keywords

  • ART adherence
  • Low birthweight
  • Postpartum women
  • Qualitative
  • Retention in HIV care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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