Lossy three-dimensional JPEG2000 compression of abdominal CT images: Assessment of the visually lossless threshold and effect of compression ratio on image quality

Helmut Ringl, Ruediger E. Schernthaner, Christiane Kulinna-Cosentini, Michael Weber, Cornelia Schaefer-Prokop, Christian J. Herold, Wolfgang Schima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To retrospectively determine the maximum compression ratio at which compressed images are indistinguishable from the original by using a three-dimensional (3D) wavelet algorithm. Materials and Methods: The protocol of this study was approved by the local Institutional Review Board and informed consent was waived. Sixty emergency abdominal computed tomographic (CT) scans of patients (31 men, 29 women; mean age ± standard deviation, 50.8 years ± 20.1; range, 17-80 years) with acute abdominal pain were subjected to lossy irreversible three-dimensional Joint Photographic Experts Group 2000 (3D-JPEG2000) compression by using four compression ratios (4:1, 8:1, 12:1, and 16:1). Groups contained five patients for each of 12 common diagnoses for acute abdominal pain. Images were obtained by using a multidetector GT scanner (Sensation Cardiac 64; Siemens, Forcheim, Germany) with 3- and 6-mm-thick sections. Three radiologists independently compared one case-relevant image per patient with the original image at different compression ratios. They had to determine which image was the original by using a forced-choice, two-alternative model and to subjectively rank image quality. For analysis, a binomial test was used, a Bonferroni correction was applied, and a P value of .01 indicated a significant difference. Results: Images compressed at ratios of 4:1 and 8:1 were visually indistinguishable and essentially indistinguishable, respectively, from the original images (P > .01 for all readers). For the 12:1 and 16:1 ratios, all readers definitively (P <.001) identified the original images. Conclusion: The highest 3D-JPEG2000 compression ratio for abdominal CT scans, at which compressed images are essentially indistinguishable from the original, is 8:1.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)467-474
Number of pages8
JournalRadiology
Volume245
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Acute Pain
Abdominal Pain
Research Ethics Committees
Informed Consent
Germany
Emergencies
Radiologists

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Ringl, H., Schernthaner, R. E., Kulinna-Cosentini, C., Weber, M., Schaefer-Prokop, C., Herold, C. J., & Schima, W. (2007). Lossy three-dimensional JPEG2000 compression of abdominal CT images: Assessment of the visually lossless threshold and effect of compression ratio on image quality. Radiology, 245(2), 467-474. https://doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2452061713

Lossy three-dimensional JPEG2000 compression of abdominal CT images : Assessment of the visually lossless threshold and effect of compression ratio on image quality. / Ringl, Helmut; Schernthaner, Ruediger E.; Kulinna-Cosentini, Christiane; Weber, Michael; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia; Herold, Christian J.; Schima, Wolfgang.

In: Radiology, Vol. 245, No. 2, 11.2007, p. 467-474.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ringl, H, Schernthaner, RE, Kulinna-Cosentini, C, Weber, M, Schaefer-Prokop, C, Herold, CJ & Schima, W 2007, 'Lossy three-dimensional JPEG2000 compression of abdominal CT images: Assessment of the visually lossless threshold and effect of compression ratio on image quality', Radiology, vol. 245, no. 2, pp. 467-474. https://doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2452061713
Ringl, Helmut ; Schernthaner, Ruediger E. ; Kulinna-Cosentini, Christiane ; Weber, Michael ; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia ; Herold, Christian J. ; Schima, Wolfgang. / Lossy three-dimensional JPEG2000 compression of abdominal CT images : Assessment of the visually lossless threshold and effect of compression ratio on image quality. In: Radiology. 2007 ; Vol. 245, No. 2. pp. 467-474.
@article{fcd076cc53c64fa989657f4aa87d0f39,
title = "Lossy three-dimensional JPEG2000 compression of abdominal CT images: Assessment of the visually lossless threshold and effect of compression ratio on image quality",
abstract = "Purpose: To retrospectively determine the maximum compression ratio at which compressed images are indistinguishable from the original by using a three-dimensional (3D) wavelet algorithm. Materials and Methods: The protocol of this study was approved by the local Institutional Review Board and informed consent was waived. Sixty emergency abdominal computed tomographic (CT) scans of patients (31 men, 29 women; mean age ± standard deviation, 50.8 years ± 20.1; range, 17-80 years) with acute abdominal pain were subjected to lossy irreversible three-dimensional Joint Photographic Experts Group 2000 (3D-JPEG2000) compression by using four compression ratios (4:1, 8:1, 12:1, and 16:1). Groups contained five patients for each of 12 common diagnoses for acute abdominal pain. Images were obtained by using a multidetector GT scanner (Sensation Cardiac 64; Siemens, Forcheim, Germany) with 3- and 6-mm-thick sections. Three radiologists independently compared one case-relevant image per patient with the original image at different compression ratios. They had to determine which image was the original by using a forced-choice, two-alternative model and to subjectively rank image quality. For analysis, a binomial test was used, a Bonferroni correction was applied, and a P value of .01 indicated a significant difference. Results: Images compressed at ratios of 4:1 and 8:1 were visually indistinguishable and essentially indistinguishable, respectively, from the original images (P > .01 for all readers). For the 12:1 and 16:1 ratios, all readers definitively (P <.001) identified the original images. Conclusion: The highest 3D-JPEG2000 compression ratio for abdominal CT scans, at which compressed images are essentially indistinguishable from the original, is 8:1.",
author = "Helmut Ringl and Schernthaner, {Ruediger E.} and Christiane Kulinna-Cosentini and Michael Weber and Cornelia Schaefer-Prokop and Herold, {Christian J.} and Wolfgang Schima",
year = "2007",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1148/radiol.2452061713",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "245",
pages = "467--474",
journal = "Radiology",
issn = "0033-8419",
publisher = "Radiological Society of North America Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Lossy three-dimensional JPEG2000 compression of abdominal CT images

T2 - Assessment of the visually lossless threshold and effect of compression ratio on image quality

AU - Ringl, Helmut

AU - Schernthaner, Ruediger E.

AU - Kulinna-Cosentini, Christiane

AU - Weber, Michael

AU - Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia

AU - Herold, Christian J.

AU - Schima, Wolfgang

PY - 2007/11

Y1 - 2007/11

N2 - Purpose: To retrospectively determine the maximum compression ratio at which compressed images are indistinguishable from the original by using a three-dimensional (3D) wavelet algorithm. Materials and Methods: The protocol of this study was approved by the local Institutional Review Board and informed consent was waived. Sixty emergency abdominal computed tomographic (CT) scans of patients (31 men, 29 women; mean age ± standard deviation, 50.8 years ± 20.1; range, 17-80 years) with acute abdominal pain were subjected to lossy irreversible three-dimensional Joint Photographic Experts Group 2000 (3D-JPEG2000) compression by using four compression ratios (4:1, 8:1, 12:1, and 16:1). Groups contained five patients for each of 12 common diagnoses for acute abdominal pain. Images were obtained by using a multidetector GT scanner (Sensation Cardiac 64; Siemens, Forcheim, Germany) with 3- and 6-mm-thick sections. Three radiologists independently compared one case-relevant image per patient with the original image at different compression ratios. They had to determine which image was the original by using a forced-choice, two-alternative model and to subjectively rank image quality. For analysis, a binomial test was used, a Bonferroni correction was applied, and a P value of .01 indicated a significant difference. Results: Images compressed at ratios of 4:1 and 8:1 were visually indistinguishable and essentially indistinguishable, respectively, from the original images (P > .01 for all readers). For the 12:1 and 16:1 ratios, all readers definitively (P <.001) identified the original images. Conclusion: The highest 3D-JPEG2000 compression ratio for abdominal CT scans, at which compressed images are essentially indistinguishable from the original, is 8:1.

AB - Purpose: To retrospectively determine the maximum compression ratio at which compressed images are indistinguishable from the original by using a three-dimensional (3D) wavelet algorithm. Materials and Methods: The protocol of this study was approved by the local Institutional Review Board and informed consent was waived. Sixty emergency abdominal computed tomographic (CT) scans of patients (31 men, 29 women; mean age ± standard deviation, 50.8 years ± 20.1; range, 17-80 years) with acute abdominal pain were subjected to lossy irreversible three-dimensional Joint Photographic Experts Group 2000 (3D-JPEG2000) compression by using four compression ratios (4:1, 8:1, 12:1, and 16:1). Groups contained five patients for each of 12 common diagnoses for acute abdominal pain. Images were obtained by using a multidetector GT scanner (Sensation Cardiac 64; Siemens, Forcheim, Germany) with 3- and 6-mm-thick sections. Three radiologists independently compared one case-relevant image per patient with the original image at different compression ratios. They had to determine which image was the original by using a forced-choice, two-alternative model and to subjectively rank image quality. For analysis, a binomial test was used, a Bonferroni correction was applied, and a P value of .01 indicated a significant difference. Results: Images compressed at ratios of 4:1 and 8:1 were visually indistinguishable and essentially indistinguishable, respectively, from the original images (P > .01 for all readers). For the 12:1 and 16:1 ratios, all readers definitively (P <.001) identified the original images. Conclusion: The highest 3D-JPEG2000 compression ratio for abdominal CT scans, at which compressed images are essentially indistinguishable from the original, is 8:1.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=35349013622&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=35349013622&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1148/radiol.2452061713

DO - 10.1148/radiol.2452061713

M3 - Article

C2 - 17890355

AN - SCOPUS:35349013622

VL - 245

SP - 467

EP - 474

JO - Radiology

JF - Radiology

SN - 0033-8419

IS - 2

ER -