Loss of peripheral sensory function explains much of the increase in postural sway in healthy older adults

Eric Anson, Robin T. Bigelow, Bonnielin Swenor, Nandini Deshpande, Stephanie Studenski, John J. Jeka, Yuri Agrawal

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Abstract

Postural sway increases with age and peripheral sensory disease. Whether, peripheral sensory function is related to postural sway independent of age in healthy adults is unclear. Here, we investigated the relationship between tests of visual function (VISFIELD), vestibular function (CANAL or OTOLITH), proprioceptive function (PROP), and age, with center of mass sway area (COM) measured with eyes open then closed on firm and then a foam surface. A cross-sectional sample of 366 community dwelling healthy adults from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging was tested. Multiple linear regressions examined the association between COM and VISFIELD, PROP, CANAL, and OTOLITH separately and in multi-sensory models controlling for age and gender. PROP dominated sensory prediction of sway across most balance conditions (β's = 0.09-0.19, p's < 0.001), except on foam eyes closed where CANAL function loss was the only significant sensory predictor of sway (β = 2.12, p < 0.016). Age was not a consistent predictor of sway. This suggests loss of peripheral sensory function explains much of the age-associated increase in sway.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Article number202
JournalFrontiers in Aging Neuroscience
Volume9
Issue numberJUN
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 20 2017

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Independent Living
Baltimore
Longitudinal Studies
Linear Models

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Postural sway
  • Proprioception
  • Vestibular
  • Vision

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Loss of peripheral sensory function explains much of the increase in postural sway in healthy older adults. / Anson, Eric; Bigelow, Robin T.; Swenor, Bonnielin; Deshpande, Nandini; Studenski, Stephanie; Jeka, John J.; Agrawal, Yuri.

In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, Vol. 9, No. JUN, 202, 20.06.2017.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Anson, Eric ; Bigelow, Robin T. ; Swenor, Bonnielin ; Deshpande, Nandini ; Studenski, Stephanie ; Jeka, John J. ; Agrawal, Yuri. / Loss of peripheral sensory function explains much of the increase in postural sway in healthy older adults. In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience. 2017 ; Vol. 9, No. JUN.
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