Loss of heterozygosity at 1p36 independently predicts for disease progression but not decreased overall survival probability in neuroblastoma patients: A children's cancer group study

John M. Maris, Matthew J. Weiss, Chun Guo, Robert B. Gerbing, Daniel O. Stram, Peter S. White, Michael D. Hogarty, Erik P. Sulman, Patricia M. Thompson, John N. Lukens, Katherine K. Matthay, Robert C. Seeger, Garrett M. Brodeur

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To determine the independent prognostic significance of 1p36 loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in a representative group of neuroblastoma patients. Patients and Methods: Diagnostic tumor specimens from 238 patients registered onto the most recent Children's Cancer Group phase III clinical trials were assayed for LOH with 13 microsatellite polymorphic markers spanning chromosome band 1p36. Allelic status at 1p36 was correlated with other prognostic variables and disease outcome. Results: LOH at 1p36 was detected in 83 (35%) of 238 neuroblastomas. There was a correlation of 1p36 LOH with age at diagnosis greater than 1 year (P = .026), metastatic disease (P < .001), elevated serum ferritin level (P < .001), unfavorable histopathology (P < .001), and MYCN oncogene amplification (P < .001). LOH at 1p36 was associated with decreased event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) prob- abilities (P < .0001). For the 180 cases with single-copy MYCN, 1p36 LOH status was highly correlated with decreased EFS (P = .0002) but not OS (P = .1212). Entering 1p36 LOH into a multivariate regression model suggested a trend toward an independent association with decreased EFS (P = .0558) but not with decreased OS (P = .3687). Furthermore, allelic status at 1p36 was the only prognostic variable that was significantly associated with decreased EFS in low-risk neuroblastoma patients (P = .0148). Conclusion: LOH at 1p36 is independently associated with decreased EFS, but not OS, in neuroblastoma patients. Determination of 1p36 allelic status may be useful for predicting which neuroblastoma patient's with otherwise favorable clinical and biologic features are more likely to have disease progression. (C) 2000 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1888-1899
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume18
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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