Longitudinal relationships of religious worship attendance and spirituality with major depression, anxiety disorders, and suicidal ideation and attempts: Findings from the Baltimore epidemiologic catchment area study

Daniel Rasic, Jennifer A. Robinson, James Bolton, O. Joseph Bienvenu, Jitender Sareen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We present findings on the longitudinal relationships of religious worship attendance and seeking spiritual comfort with subsequent major depression, anxiety disorders and suicidal ideation/attempts using data from Waves 3 and 4 of the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study (N = 1091). Respondents who attended religious services at least once per year had decreased odds of subsequent suicide attempts compared with those who did not attend religious services (AOR = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.13-0.84). Seeking spiritual comfort at baseline was associated with decreased odds of suicidal ideation (AOR = 0.55, 95% CI: 0.31-0.99). These finding were independent of the effects of the presence of the suicidal ideation/attempts, comorbid mental disorders, social supports and chronic physical conditions at baseline. These results suggest that religious attendance is possibly an independent protective factor against suicide attempts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)848-854
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Psychiatric Research
Volume45
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011

Keywords

  • Anxiety disorders
  • Major depression
  • Religion
  • Religious attendance
  • Social supports
  • Spirituality
  • Suicide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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