Longitudinal quantification and visualization of intracerebral haemorrhage using multimodal magnetic resonance and diffusion tensor imaging

S. Y.Matthew Goh, Andrei Irimia, Carinna M. Torgerson, Meral A. Tubi, Courtney R. Real, Daniel F. Hanley, Neil A. Martin, Paul M. Vespa, John D. Van Horn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To demonstrate a set of approaches using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography whereby pathology-affected white matter (WM) fibres in patients with intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) can be selectively visualized. Methods: Using structural neuroimaging and DTI volumes acquired longitudinally from three representative patients with ICH, the spatial configuration of ICH-related trauma is delineated and the WM fibre bundles intersecting each ICH lesion are identified and visualized. Both the extent of ICH lesions as well as the proportion of WM fibres intersecting the ICH pathology are quantified and compared across subjects. Results: This method successfully demonstrates longitudinal volumetric differences in ICH lesion load and differences across time in the percentage of fibres which intersect the primary injury. Conclusions: Because neurological conditions such as intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) frequently exhibit pathology-related effects which lead to the exertion of mechanical pressure upon surrounding tissues and, thereby, to the deformation and/or displacement of WM fibres, DTI fibre tractography is highly suitable for assessing longitudinal changes in WM fibre integrity and mechanical displacement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)438-445
Number of pages8
JournalBrain Injury
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

Keywords

  • Diffusion tensor imaging
  • Intracerebral haemorrhage
  • Longitudinal study
  • Magnetic resonance imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Neurology

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