Longitudinal Mechanisms Linking Perceived Racial Discrimination to Aggressive Delinquency among North American Indigenous Youth

Dane Hautala, Kelley Sittner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: Drawing from an integrated general strain theory framework, the purpose of the study is to examine the longitudinal mediating and moderating mechanisms linking perceived racial discrimination with aggressive delinquency among North American Indigenous (i.e., American Indian and Canadian First Nations) youth. Method: Data come from an eight-year longitudinal study of Indigenous youth residing on reservations/reserves in the upper Midwest and Canada (N = 659). Scales were created for discrimination, depressive symptoms, school bonds, and delinquent peer associations at years 2 and 3, and a count measure of aggression was created at years 2, 3, and 5. Cross-lagged path analysis models were estimated to examine possible mediating effects of depressive symptoms, school bonds, and delinquent peer associations. Separate regression models were examined to test for possible moderating effects of the aforementioned variables. Results: The results of a longitudinal path analysis model showed that discrimination indirectly increased aggression through decreased school bonds and increased delinquent peer associations. Depressive symptoms was the only significant moderator, and contrary to expectations, the effect of discrimination on aggression declined in magnitude as depressive symptoms increased. Conclusions: Discrimination is a key criminogenic stressor among Indigenous youth and is linked with multiple adverse outcomes through the adolescent years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)694-735
Number of pages42
JournalJournal of Research in Crime and Delinquency
Volume56
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • American Indian
  • First Nations
  • discrimination
  • general strain theory
  • race

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Longitudinal Mechanisms Linking Perceived Racial Discrimination to Aggressive Delinquency among North American Indigenous Youth'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this