Long-term Survival and Function After Suspected Gram-negative Sepsis

Trish M. Perl, Luann Dvorak, Richard P. Wenzel, Taekyu Hwang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To determine the long-term (>3 months) survival of septic patients, to develop mathematical models that predict patients likely to survive long-term, and to measure the health and functional status of surviving patients. A large tertiary care university hospital and an associated Veterans Affairs Medical Center. From December 1986 to December 1990, a total of 103 patients with suspected gram-negative sepsis entered a double-blind, placebo-controlled efficacy trial of monoclonal antiendotoxin antibody. Of these, we followed up 100 patients for 7667 patient-months. Beginning in May 1992, we reviewed hospital records and contacted all known survivors. We measured the health status of all surviving patients. The determinants of long-term survival (up to 6 years) were identified through two Cox proportional hazard regression models: one that included patient characteristics identified at the time of sepsis (bedside model) and another that included bedside, infection-related, and treatment characteristics (overall model). Of the 60 patients in the cohort who died at a median interval of 30.5 days after sepsis, 32 died within the first month of the septic episode, seven died within 3 months, and four more died within 6 months. In the bedside multivariate model constructed to predict long-term survival, large hazard ratios (HRs) were associated with severity of underlying illness as classified by McCabe and Jackson criteria (for rapidly fatal disease, HR=30.4, P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)338-345
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume274
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 26 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Sepsis
Survival
Health Status
Hospital Records
Veterans
Tertiary Healthcare
Proportional Hazards Models
Survivors
Theoretical Models
Monoclonal Antibodies
Placebos
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Long-term Survival and Function After Suspected Gram-negative Sepsis. / Perl, Trish M.; Dvorak, Luann; Wenzel, Richard P.; Hwang, Taekyu.

In: Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 274, No. 4, 26.07.1995, p. 338-345.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Perl, Trish M. ; Dvorak, Luann ; Wenzel, Richard P. ; Hwang, Taekyu. / Long-term Survival and Function After Suspected Gram-negative Sepsis. In: Journal of the American Medical Association. 1995 ; Vol. 274, No. 4. pp. 338-345.
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