Long-term retention in an employer-based, commercial weight-loss programme

E. Alexander, Eva Tseng, N. Durkin, G. J. Jerome, Arlene Dalcin, Lawrence Appel, Jeanne Clark, Kimberly A Gudzune

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The aim of this study is to examine factors associated with long-term retention in a commercial weight-loss programme. We conducted a retrospective analysis of an employer-based, commercial programme from 2013 to 2016. Our dependent variable was 'long-term retention', defined as continuously enrolled participants who actively engaged through coach calls at 6 and 12 months. Independent variables included baseline demographics, programme engagement and weight change. We conducted multivariate logistic regression analyses assessing for differences in long-term retention by several factors, adjusted for employer clustering. Overall, 68.3% were retained at 6% and 45.9% at 12 months. Greater number of coach calls and website logins during the first 3 months significantly increased the odds of long-term retention, while having chronic conditions significantly decreased the odds. Weight-loss success (≥5% loss at 6 months) was significantly associated with increased odds of retention (12-month: odds ratio [OR] 2.80, P < 0.001), while early weight-loss failure (≥0% weight change at 1 month) significantly decreased odds of retention (12-month: OR 0.66, P = 0.008). In an employer-based, commercial weight loss programme, greater early programme engagement was associated with long-term retention. Given these programmes' popularity and potential reach, our results could be used to develop and test strategies designed to improve retention in commercial weight-loss programmes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e12284
JournalClinical obesity
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

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Weight Reduction Programs
Weight Loss
Odds Ratio
Weights and Measures
Cluster Analysis
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Demography
Mentoring

Keywords

  • Commercial weight-loss programme
  • retention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Long-term retention in an employer-based, commercial weight-loss programme. / Alexander, E.; Tseng, Eva; Durkin, N.; Jerome, G. J.; Dalcin, Arlene; Appel, Lawrence; Clark, Jeanne; Gudzune, Kimberly A.

In: Clinical obesity, Vol. 9, No. 1, 01.02.2019, p. e12284.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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