Long-term nutritional consequences of bowel segment use for lower urinary tract reconstruction in pediatric patients

Naida B. Kalloo, Robert D. Jeffs, John P. Gearhart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. To identify whether nutritional abnormalities, specifically vitamin B12 deficiency, folate deficiency, and low carotene levels, are long-term sequelae of the use of ileum and/or colon for lower urinary tract reconstruction in pediatric patients. Methods. Serum levels of vitamin B12, methyl malonic acid (MMA), carotene, and folate were measured 3 to 13 years (mean 6) after surgery in patients less than 18 years old at the time of operation. Results. Thirteen (44.8%) of 29 patients had abnormal nutritional serum levels, with 5 (38.5%) of 13 having more than one abnormal value. Vitamin B12 was low in 4 (14%) of 29 patients; MMA was abnormally high in 7 (26%) of 27; and both folate and carotene levels were low in 4 (14.8%) of 27. No patient with reconstruction with colon alone (n = 3) had abnormal values, and no patient had any clinical signs or symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency or fat malabsorption. Conclusions. Nutritional abnormalities can occur in patients after lower urinary tract reconstruction with ileum. No patient in this study had symptomatic abnormalities; however, long-term clinical effects may be significant. The implications of low folate levels in women of childbearing age must also be taken into consideration because of the potential association with congenital anomalies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)967-971
Number of pages5
JournalUrology
Volume50
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

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