Long-term engraftment, graft-vs.-host disease, and immunologic reconstitution after experimental transplantation of allogeneic peripheral blood cells from G-CSF-treated donors

Luying Pan, Scott Bressler, Kenneth R. Cooke, Werner Krenger, Mahesh Karandikar, James L.M. Ferrara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) are an alternative source of bone marrow for allogeneic transplantation. Reports from recent clinical trials using granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized PBPC for allogeneic transplantation show incidence and severity of graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) similar to those observed in conventional bone marrow transplantation (BMT), despite the presence of 10- to 20-fold more T cells in the PBPC inoculum. In the present study, we examined the effects of pretreatment of donors with G-CSF on GVHD, long-term engraftment, and lymphocyte reconstitution in a murine parent→F1 model (B6.Ly-5a→B6D2F1) using splenocytes as a source of peripheral progenitor cells. Recipients of splenocytes from G-CSF-treated donors experienced less mortality from acute GVHD and showed sustained weight gain by day 100 after transplantation. At that time, there was no histologie evidence of GVHD in either liver or gut. Recipients of splenocytes from G-CSF-treated donors showed complete donor engraftment within 1 month, which was sustained until the end of the observation period. In contrast, recipients of T cell-depleted splenocytes showed slower donor engraftment and persistent donor/host chimerism. In addition, lymphocyte phenotype and function in mice receiving splenocytes from G-CSF-treated donors was significantly restored by day 100 after transplantation. Thus, the use of G-CSF-mobilized PBPC may provide significant advantages to conventional BMT by reducing GVHD without impairing long-term engraftment and immunologic reconstitution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)126-133
Number of pages8
JournalBiology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Volume2
Issue number3
StatePublished - Oct 1996
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Engraftment
  • Graft-vs.-host disease
  • Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor
  • Transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Transplantation

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