Long-term effects of renin-angiotensin system-blocking therapy and a low blood pressure goal on progression of hypertensive chronic kidney disease in African Americans

Lawrence Appel, Jackson T. Wright, Tom Greene, John W. Kusek, Julia B. Lewis, Xuelei Wang, Michael S. Lipkowitz, Keith C. Norris, George L. Bakris, Mahboob Rahman, Gabriel Contreras, Stephen G. Rostand, Joel D. Kopple, Francis B. Gabbai, Gerald I. Schulman, Jennifer J. Gassman, Jeanne B Charleston, Lawrence Y. Agodoa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Antihypertensive drugs that block the renin-angiotensin system (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors [ACEIs] or angiotensin receptor blockers) are recommended for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). A low blood pressure (BP) goal (BP, 2). Following a 3X2-factorial trial (1995-2001) that tested 3 drugs used as initial antihypertensive therapy (ACEIs, calcium channel blockers, and β-blockers) and 2 levels of BP control (usual and low), we conducted a cohort study (2002-2007) in which participants were treated with ACEIs to a BP lower than 130/80 mm Hg. The outcome measures were a composite of doubling of the serum creatinine level, end-stage renal disease, or death. Results: During each year of the cohort study, the annual use of an ACEI or an angiotensin receptor blocker ranged from 83.7% to 89.0% (vs 38.5% to 49.8% during the trial). The mean BP in the cohort study was 133/78 mm Hg (vs 136/82 mm Hg in the trial). Overall, 567 participants experienced the primary outcome; the 10-year cumulative incidence rate was 53.9%. Of 576 participants with at least 7 years of follow-up, 33.5% experienced a slow decline in kidney function (mean annual decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate, 2). Conclusion: Despite the benefits of renin-angiotensin system-blocking therapy on CKD progression, most African Americans with hypertensive CKD who are treated with currently recommended BP therapy continue to progress during the long term.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)832-839
Number of pages8
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume168
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 28 2008

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Renin-Angiotensin System
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
African Americans
Hypotension
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors
Blood Pressure
Cohort Studies
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists
Antihypertensive Agents
Therapeutics
Calcium Channel Blockers
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Chronic Kidney Failure
Disease Progression
Creatinine
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Kidney
Incidence
Serum
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

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Long-term effects of renin-angiotensin system-blocking therapy and a low blood pressure goal on progression of hypertensive chronic kidney disease in African Americans. / Appel, Lawrence; Wright, Jackson T.; Greene, Tom; Kusek, John W.; Lewis, Julia B.; Wang, Xuelei; Lipkowitz, Michael S.; Norris, Keith C.; Bakris, George L.; Rahman, Mahboob; Contreras, Gabriel; Rostand, Stephen G.; Kopple, Joel D.; Gabbai, Francis B.; Schulman, Gerald I.; Gassman, Jennifer J.; Charleston, Jeanne B; Agodoa, Lawrence Y.

In: Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 168, No. 8, 28.04.2008, p. 832-839.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Appel, L, Wright, JT, Greene, T, Kusek, JW, Lewis, JB, Wang, X, Lipkowitz, MS, Norris, KC, Bakris, GL, Rahman, M, Contreras, G, Rostand, SG, Kopple, JD, Gabbai, FB, Schulman, GI, Gassman, JJ, Charleston, JB & Agodoa, LY 2008, 'Long-term effects of renin-angiotensin system-blocking therapy and a low blood pressure goal on progression of hypertensive chronic kidney disease in African Americans', Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 168, no. 8, pp. 832-839. https://doi.org/10.1001/archinte.168.8.832
Appel, Lawrence ; Wright, Jackson T. ; Greene, Tom ; Kusek, John W. ; Lewis, Julia B. ; Wang, Xuelei ; Lipkowitz, Michael S. ; Norris, Keith C. ; Bakris, George L. ; Rahman, Mahboob ; Contreras, Gabriel ; Rostand, Stephen G. ; Kopple, Joel D. ; Gabbai, Francis B. ; Schulman, Gerald I. ; Gassman, Jennifer J. ; Charleston, Jeanne B ; Agodoa, Lawrence Y. / Long-term effects of renin-angiotensin system-blocking therapy and a low blood pressure goal on progression of hypertensive chronic kidney disease in African Americans. In: Archives of Internal Medicine. 2008 ; Vol. 168, No. 8. pp. 832-839.
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abstract = "Background: Antihypertensive drugs that block the renin-angiotensin system (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors [ACEIs] or angiotensin receptor blockers) are recommended for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). A low blood pressure (BP) goal (BP, 2). Following a 3X2-factorial trial (1995-2001) that tested 3 drugs used as initial antihypertensive therapy (ACEIs, calcium channel blockers, and β-blockers) and 2 levels of BP control (usual and low), we conducted a cohort study (2002-2007) in which participants were treated with ACEIs to a BP lower than 130/80 mm Hg. The outcome measures were a composite of doubling of the serum creatinine level, end-stage renal disease, or death. Results: During each year of the cohort study, the annual use of an ACEI or an angiotensin receptor blocker ranged from 83.7{\%} to 89.0{\%} (vs 38.5{\%} to 49.8{\%} during the trial). The mean BP in the cohort study was 133/78 mm Hg (vs 136/82 mm Hg in the trial). Overall, 567 participants experienced the primary outcome; the 10-year cumulative incidence rate was 53.9{\%}. Of 576 participants with at least 7 years of follow-up, 33.5{\%} experienced a slow decline in kidney function (mean annual decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate, 2). Conclusion: Despite the benefits of renin-angiotensin system-blocking therapy on CKD progression, most African Americans with hypertensive CKD who are treated with currently recommended BP therapy continue to progress during the long term.",
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T1 - Long-term effects of renin-angiotensin system-blocking therapy and a low blood pressure goal on progression of hypertensive chronic kidney disease in African Americans

AU - Appel, Lawrence

AU - Wright, Jackson T.

AU - Greene, Tom

AU - Kusek, John W.

AU - Lewis, Julia B.

AU - Wang, Xuelei

AU - Lipkowitz, Michael S.

AU - Norris, Keith C.

AU - Bakris, George L.

AU - Rahman, Mahboob

AU - Contreras, Gabriel

AU - Rostand, Stephen G.

AU - Kopple, Joel D.

AU - Gabbai, Francis B.

AU - Schulman, Gerald I.

AU - Gassman, Jennifer J.

AU - Charleston, Jeanne B

AU - Agodoa, Lawrence Y.

PY - 2008/4/28

Y1 - 2008/4/28

N2 - Background: Antihypertensive drugs that block the renin-angiotensin system (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors [ACEIs] or angiotensin receptor blockers) are recommended for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). A low blood pressure (BP) goal (BP, 2). Following a 3X2-factorial trial (1995-2001) that tested 3 drugs used as initial antihypertensive therapy (ACEIs, calcium channel blockers, and β-blockers) and 2 levels of BP control (usual and low), we conducted a cohort study (2002-2007) in which participants were treated with ACEIs to a BP lower than 130/80 mm Hg. The outcome measures were a composite of doubling of the serum creatinine level, end-stage renal disease, or death. Results: During each year of the cohort study, the annual use of an ACEI or an angiotensin receptor blocker ranged from 83.7% to 89.0% (vs 38.5% to 49.8% during the trial). The mean BP in the cohort study was 133/78 mm Hg (vs 136/82 mm Hg in the trial). Overall, 567 participants experienced the primary outcome; the 10-year cumulative incidence rate was 53.9%. Of 576 participants with at least 7 years of follow-up, 33.5% experienced a slow decline in kidney function (mean annual decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate, 2). Conclusion: Despite the benefits of renin-angiotensin system-blocking therapy on CKD progression, most African Americans with hypertensive CKD who are treated with currently recommended BP therapy continue to progress during the long term.

AB - Background: Antihypertensive drugs that block the renin-angiotensin system (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors [ACEIs] or angiotensin receptor blockers) are recommended for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). A low blood pressure (BP) goal (BP, 2). Following a 3X2-factorial trial (1995-2001) that tested 3 drugs used as initial antihypertensive therapy (ACEIs, calcium channel blockers, and β-blockers) and 2 levels of BP control (usual and low), we conducted a cohort study (2002-2007) in which participants were treated with ACEIs to a BP lower than 130/80 mm Hg. The outcome measures were a composite of doubling of the serum creatinine level, end-stage renal disease, or death. Results: During each year of the cohort study, the annual use of an ACEI or an angiotensin receptor blocker ranged from 83.7% to 89.0% (vs 38.5% to 49.8% during the trial). The mean BP in the cohort study was 133/78 mm Hg (vs 136/82 mm Hg in the trial). Overall, 567 participants experienced the primary outcome; the 10-year cumulative incidence rate was 53.9%. Of 576 participants with at least 7 years of follow-up, 33.5% experienced a slow decline in kidney function (mean annual decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate, 2). Conclusion: Despite the benefits of renin-angiotensin system-blocking therapy on CKD progression, most African Americans with hypertensive CKD who are treated with currently recommended BP therapy continue to progress during the long term.

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