Long Noncoding RNAs in the Pathogenesis of Barrett's Esophagus and Esophageal Carcinoma

John M. Abraham, Stephen Meltzer

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

For many years, only a small fraction of the human genome was believed to regulate cell function and development. This protein-coding portion composed only 1% to 2% of 3 billion human DNA base pairs—the remaining sequence was classified as junk DNA. Subsequent research has revealed that most of the genome is transcribed into a broad array of noncoding RNAs, ranging in size from microRNA (20–23 nucleotides) to long noncoding RNA (lncRNA, more than 200 nucleotides). These noncoding RNA classes have been shown to use diverse molecular mechanisms to control gene expression and organ system development. As anticipated, alterations in this large control system can contribute to disease pathogenesis and carcinogenesis. We review the involvement of noncoding RNAs, lncRNAs in particular, in development of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal carcinoma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)27-34
Number of pages8
JournalGastroenterology
Volume153
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

Fingerprint

Long Noncoding RNA
Untranslated RNA
Barrett Esophagus
Carcinoma
Nucleotides
Intergenic DNA
Human Genome
MicroRNAs
Carcinogenesis
Genome
Gene Expression
DNA
Research
Proteins

Keywords

  • Barrett's Esophagus
  • Esophageal Carcinoma
  • lncRNAs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Long Noncoding RNAs in the Pathogenesis of Barrett's Esophagus and Esophageal Carcinoma. / Abraham, John M.; Meltzer, Stephen.

In: Gastroenterology, Vol. 153, No. 1, 01.07.2017, p. 27-34.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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