Living with tics: Reduced impairment and improved quality of life for youth with chronic tic disorders

Joseph F. McGuire, Elysse Arnold, Jennifer M. Park, Joshua M. Nadeau, Adam B. Lewin, Tanya K. Murphy, Eric A. Storch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Pharmacological and behavioral interventions have focused on reducing tic severity to alleviate tic-related impairment for youth with chronic tic disorders (CTDs), with no existing intervention focused on the adverse psychosocial consequences of tics. This study examined the preliminary efficacy of a modularized cognitive behavioral intervention ("Living with Tics", LWT) in reducing tic-related impairment and improving quality of life relative to a waitlist control of equal duration. Twenty-four youth (ages 7-17 years) with Tourette Disorder or Chronic Motor Tic Disorder and psychosocial impairment participated. A treatment-blind evaluator conducted all pre- and post-treatment clinician-rated measures. Youth were randomly assigned to receive the LWT intervention (n=12) or a 10-week waitlist (n=12). The LWT intervention consisted of up to 10 weekly sessions targeted at reducing tic-related impairment and developing skills to manage psychosocial consequences of tics. Youth in the LWT condition experienced significantly reduced clinician-rated tic-impairment, and improved child-rated quality of life. Ten youth (83%) in the LWT group were classified as treatment responders compared to four youth in the waitlist condition (33%). Treatment gains were maintained at one-month follow-up. Findings provide preliminary data that the LWT intervention reduces tic-related impairment and improves quality of life for youth with CTDs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)571-579
Number of pages9
JournalPsychiatry research
Volume225
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 28 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Chronic tic disorders
  • Cognitive behavior therapy
  • Functional impairment
  • Quality of life
  • Tourette Disorder
  • Treatment outcome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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