Living related small bowel transplantation: Donor surgical technique

Giuliano Testa, Fabrizio Panaro, Stefano Schena, Mark Holterman, Herand Abcarian, Enrico Benedetti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To describe a standardized technique for ileal graft procurement in the setting of living related bowel transplantation. Summary Background Data: Living donor transplantation has been successfully developed for kidney, liver, pancreas, and lung transplantation. More recently, living related small bowel transplantation (LR-SBTx) has been developed with the aim of expanding the pool of intestinal graft donors and reducing the mortality in patients on the waiting list. To date, a total of 25 LR-SBTx worldwide have been reported to the international registry. We herein report the largest single center experience. Methods: A segment of ileum, 150 to 200 cm, is resected 20 cm proximal to the ileocecal valve (ICV), which is always preserved. The arterial inflow is given by the terminal branch of the superior mesenteric artery and venous outflow by a proximal segment of the superior mesenteric vein. The entire bowel is measured intraoperatively and at least 60% of intestine length is left in the donor. Results: Since 1998, we have performed 9 terminal ileum resections for small bowel donation. None of the donors has experienced persistent alteration of bowel habits or malabsorption; only 1 minor wound complication has occurred. Conclusions: Terminal ileal resection with preservation of the ICV seems to assure fast functional recovery of the donor and has minimal postoperative complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)779-784
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Surgery
Volume240
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Transplantation
Tissue Donors
Ileocecal Valve
Ileum
Transplants
Mesenteric Veins
Pancreas Transplantation
Superior Mesenteric Artery
Waiting Lists
Lung Transplantation
Living Donors
Liver Transplantation
Kidney Transplantation
Habits
Intestines
Registries
Mortality
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Living related small bowel transplantation : Donor surgical technique. / Testa, Giuliano; Panaro, Fabrizio; Schena, Stefano; Holterman, Mark; Abcarian, Herand; Benedetti, Enrico.

In: Annals of Surgery, Vol. 240, No. 5, 01.11.2004, p. 779-784.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Testa, G, Panaro, F, Schena, S, Holterman, M, Abcarian, H & Benedetti, E 2004, 'Living related small bowel transplantation: Donor surgical technique', Annals of Surgery, vol. 240, no. 5, pp. 779-784. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.sla.0000143266.59408.d7
Testa, Giuliano ; Panaro, Fabrizio ; Schena, Stefano ; Holterman, Mark ; Abcarian, Herand ; Benedetti, Enrico. / Living related small bowel transplantation : Donor surgical technique. In: Annals of Surgery. 2004 ; Vol. 240, No. 5. pp. 779-784.
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