Liver transplantation in the United States from 1987-1998: updated results from the Pitt-UNOS Liver Transplant Registry.

E. C. Seaberg, S. H. Belle, K. C. Beringer, J. L. Schivins, K. M. Detre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

CENTERS: Between 1988-1997, the total number of liver transplantations performed in the US more than doubled from 1,713-4,158, and the number of centers performing liver transplantations increased from 59-107. In recent years, the yearly net gain in the number of operating centers has slowed, and the differences in LT volume across centers has remained stable. OUTCOMES: During the first year following transplantation, patient survival was approximately the same for adults and children, while retransplantation-free survival was poorest among children. Thereafter, survival declined more rapidly among adults than among children. SURVIVAL AMONG PEDIATRIC RECIPIENTS: The estimated cumulative probability of a pediatric recipient surviving for 10 years following transplantation was .80, and surviving for 10 years without retransplantation was .59. In general, few deaths or retransplantations were observed more than 4 years after the initial transplantation. Factors independently associated with patient and retransplantation-free survival among children were year of transplantation, recipient age, being on life support while awaiting transplantation, primary liver disease, serum creatinine, total bilirubin, donor age, donor race, and warm ischemic time. Recipient race, a multi-organ transplant procedure, and serum albumin level were significantly associated with patient survival only. The use of a reduced-size or split liver for transplantation in children was independently associated with retransplantation-free survival, but not with patient survival. SURVIVAL AMONG ADULT RECIPIENTS: The estimated cumulative probability of an adult recipient surviving for 10 years following transplantation was .61, and surviving for 10 years without retransplantation was .46 with the median retransplantation-free survival time estimated at 9.2 years. Factors independently associated with patient and retransplantation-free survival among adults were year of transplantation, recipient age, recipient race, recipient location awaiting transplantation, primary liver disease, serum creatinine and albumin levels, hepatitis B surface antigen status, donor age, donor anti-CMV status, warm ischemic time, sex match, pretransplant ventilator or inotrope use, and recipient anti-HCV status. Pre-transplant bilirubin level, a multi-organ transplant procedure, and the finding of an incidental tumor were significantly associated with patient survival; and donor race, ABO match, and uncontrolled variceal bleeding were associated with retransplantation-free survival.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17-37
Number of pages21
JournalClinical transplants
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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