Liver and kidney disease in ciliopathies

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Hepatorenal fibrocystic diseases (HRFCDs) are among the most common inherited human disorders. The discovery that proteins defective in the autosomal dominant and recessive polycystic kidney diseases (ADPKD and ARPKD) localize to the primary cilia and the recognition of the role these organelles play in the pathogenesis of HRFCDs led to the term "ciliopathies." While ADPKD and ARPKD are the most common ciliopathies associated with both liver and kidney disease, variable degrees of renal and/or hepatic involvement occur in many other ciliopathies, including Joubert, Bardet-Biedl, Meckel-Gruber, and oral-facial-digital syndromes. The ductal plate malformation (DPM), a developmental abnormality of the portobiliary system, is the basis of the liver disease in ciliopathies that manifest congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF), Caroli syndrome (CS), and polycystic liver disease (PLD). Hepatocellular function remains relatively preserved in ciliopathy-associated liver diseases. The major morbidity associated with CHF is portal hypertension (PH), often leading to esophageal varices and hypersplenism. In addition, CD predisposes to recurrent cholangitis. PLD is not typically associated with PH, but may result in complications due to mass effects. The kidney pathology in ciliopathies ranges from non-functional cystic dysplastic kidneys to an isolated urinary concentration defect; the disorders contributing to this pathology, in addition to ADPKD and ARPKD, include nephronophithisis (NPHP), glomerulocystic kidney disease and medullary sponge kidneys. Decreased urinary concentration ability, resulting in polyuria and polydypsia, is the first and most common renal symptom in ciliopathies. While the majority of ADPKD, ARPKD, and NPHP patients require renal transplantation, the frequency and rate of progression to renal failure varies considerably in other ciliopathies. This review focuses on the kidney and liver disease found in the different ciliopathies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)296-306
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Medical Genetics, Part A
Volume151
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 2009

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Kidney Diseases
Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney
Liver Diseases
Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney
Portal Hypertension
Kidney
Orofaciodigital Syndromes
Medullary Sponge Kidney
Caroli Disease
Pathology
Hypersplenism
Cystic Kidney Diseases
Ciliopathies
Polyuria
Cholangitis
Esophageal and Gastric Varices
Cilia
Organelles
Kidney Transplantation
Renal Insufficiency

Keywords

  • Caroli syndrome
  • Ciliopathy
  • Congenital hepatic fibrosis
  • Cystic dysplastic kidneys
  • Ductal plate malformation
  • Medullary sponge kidney
  • Multicystic dysplastic kidneys
  • Nephronophthisis
  • Polycystic kidney disease
  • Polycystic liver disease
  • Portal hypertension
  • Primary cilia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Genetics

Cite this

Liver and kidney disease in ciliopathies. / Gunay-Aygun, Meral.

In: American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part A, Vol. 151, No. 4, 15.11.2009, p. 296-306.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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