Liquid bead array technology in the detection of common translocations in acute and chronic leukemias

Rodney E. Shackelford, Keith D. Jackson, Michael J. Hafez, Christopher Gocke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Hematologic malignancies often have specific chromosomal translocations that promote cancer initiation and progression. Translocation identification is often vital in the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of malignancies. A variety of methods including metaphase cytogenetics, in situ hybridization, microarray techniques, Southern blotting, and many variations of PCR are used to identify translocations. While all these techniques have utility, many have drawbacks limiting their clinical usefulness: high cost, slow turnaround time, low density, large sample requirements, high complexity, and difficult validation and standardization. Multiplexed RT-PCR combined with liquid bead array detection overcomes many of these limitations, allowing simultaneous amplification and detection of multiple translocations within one patient sample. This system has high reliability, reproducibility, and flexibility; low cost and low complexity; rapid turnaround time; and appropriate analyte density. Recently, Asuragen Inc. has developed a multiplexed RT-PCR liquid bead array panel that simultaneously analyzes 12 fusion transcripts found in four major types of hematologic malignancies, allowing rapid and efficient diagnosis. In this chapter, we review liquid bead array technology in relation to the specific hematologic translocations analyzed in the Signature LTx panel.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-103
Number of pages11
JournalMethods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)
Volume999
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

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Leukemia
Hematologic Neoplasms
Technology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Costs and Cost Analysis
Genetic Translocation
Metaphase
Southern Blotting
Cytogenetics
In Situ Hybridization
Neoplasms
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia
  • Acute myeloid leukemia
  • Acute promyelocytic leukemia
  • Chronic myelogenous leukemia
  • Hematologic malignancy
  • Liquid bead array
  • PCR
  • Translocation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Liquid bead array technology in the detection of common translocations in acute and chronic leukemias. / Shackelford, Rodney E.; Jackson, Keith D.; Hafez, Michael J.; Gocke, Christopher.

In: Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.), Vol. 999, 2013, p. 93-103.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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