Linking Nonrestorative Sleep and Activity Interference Through Pain Catastrophizing and Pain Severity: An Intraday Process Model Among Individuals With Fibromyalgia

Chung Jung Mun, Mary C. Davis, Claudia M. Campbell, Patrick H. Finan, Howard Tennen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Nonrestorative sleep is a key diagnostic feature of the musculoskeletal pain disorder fibromyalgia and is robustly associated with poor physical functioning, including activity interference. However, the mechanisms through which nonrestorative sleep elicits activity interference among individuals with fibromyalgia at the within-person level remain unclear. The present study tested the following 3-path mediation model, using data gathered from a 21-day electronic daily diary in 220 individuals with fibromyalgia: previous night nonrestorative sleep → morning pain catastrophizing → afternoon pain severity → end-of-day activity interference. Results of multilevel structural equation modeling supported the 3-path mediation model. Previous night's nonrestorative sleep and morning pain catastrophizing were also directly related to end-of-day activity interference. Previous night nonrestorative sleep did not significantly predict afternoon pain severity while controlling for the effect of morning pain catastrophizing. Greater nonrestorative sleep during the previous night and a higher level of morning pain catastrophizing appear to serve as risk factors for experiencing greater daily pain and activity interference later in the day. These findings point to the potential utility of targeted interventions that improve both sleep quality and pain catastrophizing to help individuals with chronic pain engage in important daily activities despite experiencing pain. Perspective: This study provides a better understanding of how nonrestorative sleep is associated with daily activity interference among individuals with fibromyalgia. An intervention that targets attenuating nonrestorative sleep and pain catastrophizing may help improve daily physical functioning of this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Pain
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Catastrophization
Fibromyalgia
Sleep
Pain
Musculoskeletal Pain
Somatoform Disorders
Chronic Pain

Keywords

  • activity interference
  • Chronic pain
  • daily diary
  • fibromyalgia
  • pain catastrophizing
  • physical functioning
  • sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Linking Nonrestorative Sleep and Activity Interference Through Pain Catastrophizing and Pain Severity: An Intraday Process Model Among Individuals With Fibromyalgia",
abstract = "Nonrestorative sleep is a key diagnostic feature of the musculoskeletal pain disorder fibromyalgia and is robustly associated with poor physical functioning, including activity interference. However, the mechanisms through which nonrestorative sleep elicits activity interference among individuals with fibromyalgia at the within-person level remain unclear. The present study tested the following 3-path mediation model, using data gathered from a 21-day electronic daily diary in 220 individuals with fibromyalgia: previous night nonrestorative sleep → morning pain catastrophizing → afternoon pain severity → end-of-day activity interference. Results of multilevel structural equation modeling supported the 3-path mediation model. Previous night's nonrestorative sleep and morning pain catastrophizing were also directly related to end-of-day activity interference. Previous night nonrestorative sleep did not significantly predict afternoon pain severity while controlling for the effect of morning pain catastrophizing. Greater nonrestorative sleep during the previous night and a higher level of morning pain catastrophizing appear to serve as risk factors for experiencing greater daily pain and activity interference later in the day. These findings point to the potential utility of targeted interventions that improve both sleep quality and pain catastrophizing to help individuals with chronic pain engage in important daily activities despite experiencing pain. Perspective: This study provides a better understanding of how nonrestorative sleep is associated with daily activity interference among individuals with fibromyalgia. An intervention that targets attenuating nonrestorative sleep and pain catastrophizing may help improve daily physical functioning of this population.",
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AU - Finan, Patrick H.

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AB - Nonrestorative sleep is a key diagnostic feature of the musculoskeletal pain disorder fibromyalgia and is robustly associated with poor physical functioning, including activity interference. However, the mechanisms through which nonrestorative sleep elicits activity interference among individuals with fibromyalgia at the within-person level remain unclear. The present study tested the following 3-path mediation model, using data gathered from a 21-day electronic daily diary in 220 individuals with fibromyalgia: previous night nonrestorative sleep → morning pain catastrophizing → afternoon pain severity → end-of-day activity interference. Results of multilevel structural equation modeling supported the 3-path mediation model. Previous night's nonrestorative sleep and morning pain catastrophizing were also directly related to end-of-day activity interference. Previous night nonrestorative sleep did not significantly predict afternoon pain severity while controlling for the effect of morning pain catastrophizing. Greater nonrestorative sleep during the previous night and a higher level of morning pain catastrophizing appear to serve as risk factors for experiencing greater daily pain and activity interference later in the day. These findings point to the potential utility of targeted interventions that improve both sleep quality and pain catastrophizing to help individuals with chronic pain engage in important daily activities despite experiencing pain. Perspective: This study provides a better understanding of how nonrestorative sleep is associated with daily activity interference among individuals with fibromyalgia. An intervention that targets attenuating nonrestorative sleep and pain catastrophizing may help improve daily physical functioning of this population.

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