Linking deforestation to malaria in the Amazon

Characterization of the breeding habitat of the principal malaria vector, Anopheles darlingi

Amy Y. Vittor, William Pan, Robert H Gilman, James Tielsch, Gregory Glass, Timothy M Shields, Wagner Sánchez-Lozano, Viviana V. Pinedo, Erit Salas-Cobos, Silvia Flores, Jonathan A. Patz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined the larval breeding habitat of a major South American malaria vector, Anopheles darlingi, in areas with varying degrees of ecologic alteration in the Peruvian Amazon. Water bodies were repeatedly sampled across 112 km of transects along the Iquitos-Nauta road in ecologically varied areas. Field data and satellite imagery were used to determine the landscape composition surrounding each site. Seventeen species of Anopheles larvae were collected. Anopheles darlingi larvae were present in 87 of 844 sites (10.3%). Sites with A. darlingi larvae had an average of 24.1% forest cover, compared with 41.0% for sites without A. darlingi (P <0.0001). Multivariate analysis identified seasonality, algae, water body size, presence of human populations, and the amount of forest and secondary growth as significant determinants of A. darlingi presence. We conclude that deforestation and associated ecologic alterations are conducive to A. darlingi larval presence, and thereby increase malaria risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5-12
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume81
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jul 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Anopheles
Conservation of Natural Resources
Malaria
Breeding
Ecosystem
Larva
Satellite Imagery
Body Water
Body Size
Multivariate Analysis
Water
Growth
Population
Forests

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Linking deforestation to malaria in the Amazon : Characterization of the breeding habitat of the principal malaria vector, Anopheles darlingi. / Vittor, Amy Y.; Pan, William; Gilman, Robert H; Tielsch, James; Glass, Gregory; Shields, Timothy M; Sánchez-Lozano, Wagner; Pinedo, Viviana V.; Salas-Cobos, Erit; Flores, Silvia; Patz, Jonathan A.

In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 81, No. 1, 07.2009, p. 5-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vittor, AY, Pan, W, Gilman, RH, Tielsch, J, Glass, G, Shields, TM, Sánchez-Lozano, W, Pinedo, VV, Salas-Cobos, E, Flores, S & Patz, JA 2009, 'Linking deforestation to malaria in the Amazon: Characterization of the breeding habitat of the principal malaria vector, Anopheles darlingi', American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 81, no. 1, pp. 5-12.
Vittor, Amy Y. ; Pan, William ; Gilman, Robert H ; Tielsch, James ; Glass, Gregory ; Shields, Timothy M ; Sánchez-Lozano, Wagner ; Pinedo, Viviana V. ; Salas-Cobos, Erit ; Flores, Silvia ; Patz, Jonathan A. / Linking deforestation to malaria in the Amazon : Characterization of the breeding habitat of the principal malaria vector, Anopheles darlingi. In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2009 ; Vol. 81, No. 1. pp. 5-12.
@article{c9ecd7a8ee584f9690fdbb7686c0e63a,
title = "Linking deforestation to malaria in the Amazon: Characterization of the breeding habitat of the principal malaria vector, Anopheles darlingi",
abstract = "This study examined the larval breeding habitat of a major South American malaria vector, Anopheles darlingi, in areas with varying degrees of ecologic alteration in the Peruvian Amazon. Water bodies were repeatedly sampled across 112 km of transects along the Iquitos-Nauta road in ecologically varied areas. Field data and satellite imagery were used to determine the landscape composition surrounding each site. Seventeen species of Anopheles larvae were collected. Anopheles darlingi larvae were present in 87 of 844 sites (10.3{\%}). Sites with A. darlingi larvae had an average of 24.1{\%} forest cover, compared with 41.0{\%} for sites without A. darlingi (P <0.0001). Multivariate analysis identified seasonality, algae, water body size, presence of human populations, and the amount of forest and secondary growth as significant determinants of A. darlingi presence. We conclude that deforestation and associated ecologic alterations are conducive to A. darlingi larval presence, and thereby increase malaria risk.",
author = "Vittor, {Amy Y.} and William Pan and Gilman, {Robert H} and James Tielsch and Gregory Glass and Shields, {Timothy M} and Wagner S{\'a}nchez-Lozano and Pinedo, {Viviana V.} and Erit Salas-Cobos and Silvia Flores and Patz, {Jonathan A.}",
year = "2009",
month = "7",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "81",
pages = "5--12",
journal = "American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene",
issn = "0002-9637",
publisher = "American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Linking deforestation to malaria in the Amazon

T2 - Characterization of the breeding habitat of the principal malaria vector, Anopheles darlingi

AU - Vittor, Amy Y.

AU - Pan, William

AU - Gilman, Robert H

AU - Tielsch, James

AU - Glass, Gregory

AU - Shields, Timothy M

AU - Sánchez-Lozano, Wagner

AU - Pinedo, Viviana V.

AU - Salas-Cobos, Erit

AU - Flores, Silvia

AU - Patz, Jonathan A.

PY - 2009/7

Y1 - 2009/7

N2 - This study examined the larval breeding habitat of a major South American malaria vector, Anopheles darlingi, in areas with varying degrees of ecologic alteration in the Peruvian Amazon. Water bodies were repeatedly sampled across 112 km of transects along the Iquitos-Nauta road in ecologically varied areas. Field data and satellite imagery were used to determine the landscape composition surrounding each site. Seventeen species of Anopheles larvae were collected. Anopheles darlingi larvae were present in 87 of 844 sites (10.3%). Sites with A. darlingi larvae had an average of 24.1% forest cover, compared with 41.0% for sites without A. darlingi (P <0.0001). Multivariate analysis identified seasonality, algae, water body size, presence of human populations, and the amount of forest and secondary growth as significant determinants of A. darlingi presence. We conclude that deforestation and associated ecologic alterations are conducive to A. darlingi larval presence, and thereby increase malaria risk.

AB - This study examined the larval breeding habitat of a major South American malaria vector, Anopheles darlingi, in areas with varying degrees of ecologic alteration in the Peruvian Amazon. Water bodies were repeatedly sampled across 112 km of transects along the Iquitos-Nauta road in ecologically varied areas. Field data and satellite imagery were used to determine the landscape composition surrounding each site. Seventeen species of Anopheles larvae were collected. Anopheles darlingi larvae were present in 87 of 844 sites (10.3%). Sites with A. darlingi larvae had an average of 24.1% forest cover, compared with 41.0% for sites without A. darlingi (P <0.0001). Multivariate analysis identified seasonality, algae, water body size, presence of human populations, and the amount of forest and secondary growth as significant determinants of A. darlingi presence. We conclude that deforestation and associated ecologic alterations are conducive to A. darlingi larval presence, and thereby increase malaria risk.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=67650287682&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=67650287682&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 81

SP - 5

EP - 12

JO - American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

JF - American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

SN - 0002-9637

IS - 1

ER -