Linking anatomical and physiological markers of auditory system degeneration with behavioral hearing assessments in a mouse (Mus musculus) model of age-related hearing loss

Anastasiya Kobrina, Katrina M. Schrode, Laurel A. Screven, Hamad Javaid, Madison M. Weinberg, Garrett Brown, Ryleigh Board, Dillan F. Villavisanis, Micheal L. Dent, Amanda M. Lauer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Age-related hearing loss is a very common sensory disability, affecting one in three older adults. Establishing a link between anatomical, physiological, and behavioral markers of presbycusis in a mouse model can improve the understanding of this disorder in humans. We measured age-related hearing loss for a variety of acoustic signals in quiet and noisy environments using an operant conditioning procedure and investigated the status of peripheral structures in CBA/CaJ mice. Mice showed the greatest degree of hearing loss in the last third of their lifespan, with higher thresholds in noisy than in quiet conditions. Changes in auditory brainstem response thresholds and waveform morphology preceded behavioral hearing loss onset. Loss of hair cells, auditory nerve fibers, and signs of stria vascularis degeneration were observed in old mice. The present work underscores the difficulty in ascribing the primary cause of age-related hearing loss to any particular type of cellular degeneration. Revealing these complex structure-function relationships is critical for establishing successful intervention strategies to restore hearing or prevent presbycusis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-103
Number of pages17
JournalNeurobiology of aging
Volume96
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

Keywords

  • ARHL
  • Animal psychoacoustics
  • Auditory brainstem response
  • Cochlear degeneration
  • Cochlear nucleus
  • Olivocochlear

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Aging
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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