Linkage of maternal caregiver smoking behaviors on environmental and clinical outcomes of children with asthma: A post-hoc analysis of a financial incentive trial targeting reduction in pediatric tobacco smoke exposures

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

(1) Background: Monthly variability in smoking behaviors in caregivers of pediatric asthmatics yields questions of how much and when does smoking reduction result in improved environmental and clinical outcomes. (2) Methods: Post hoc analysis of data from a 6 month pilot randomized-control trial occurring from May 2017 to May 2018 in Baltimore City (MD, USA). The initial trial’s primary intervention explored the utility of financial incentives in modifying caregiver smoking behaviors. Post hoc analyses examined all dyads independent of the initial trial’s randomization status. All caregivers received pediatric tobacco smoke harm reduction education, in addition to monthly encouragement to access the state tobacco quitline for individual phone-based counseling and nicotine replacement therapy. Maternal caregivers who were active cigarette smokers and their linked asthmatic child (aged 2–12 years) were grouped into two classifications (“high” versus “low”) based on the child and caregiver’s cotinine levels. A “low” cotinine level was designated by at least a 25% reduction in cotinine levels during 3 months of the trial period; achieving ≤2 months of low cotinine levels defaulted to the “high” category. Twenty-seven dyads (caregivers and children) (total n = 54) were assigned to the “high” category, and eighteen dyads (caregivers and children) (total n = 36) were allocated to the “low” category. The primary outcome measure was the correlation of caregiver cotinine levels with pediatric cotinine values. Secondary outcomes included asthma control, in addition to caregiver anxiety and depression. (3) Results: Caregivers with 3 months of ≥25% decrease in cotinine levels had a significantly greater mean change in child cotinine levels (p = 0.018). “Low” caregiver cotinine levels did not significantly improve pediatric asthma control (OR 2.12 (95% CI: 0.62–7.25)). Caregiver anxiety and depression outcomes, measured by Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-4 scores, was not significantly different based on cotinine categorization (p = 0.079); (4) Conclusion: Reduced pediatric cotinine levels were seen in caregivers who reduced their smoking for at least 3 months, but clinical outcome measures remained unchanged.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number8502
Pages (from-to)1-14
Number of pages14
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume17
Issue number22
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2 2020

Keywords

  • Asthma
  • Cotinine
  • Environmental tobacco smoke
  • Health promoting financial incentives
  • Pediatric
  • Secondhand smoke exposure
  • Smoking cessation
  • Tobacco

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Linkage of maternal caregiver smoking behaviors on environmental and clinical outcomes of children with asthma: A post-hoc analysis of a financial incentive trial targeting reduction in pediatric tobacco smoke exposures'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this