Light-induced fluctuations in membrane current of single toad rod outer segments

King-Wai Yau, T. D. Lamb, D. A. Baylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

VERTEBRATE photoreceptors respond to illumination with a reduction in the steady current of Na ions which in darkness flows inwards across the outer segment membrane; this results in hyperpolarisation of the cells1. The light responses of the receptors can be studied by measuring extracellular voltage gradients2 or by intracellular recording1, but these methods can only provide information averaged over many photoreceptors owing respectively to high extracellular conductivity and to the presence of electrical coupling between cells3-6. This averaging and the presence of dark voltage noise in photoreceptors6,7 have prevented observation of the electrical effects of individual photoisomerisations. To try to record these elementary events and to localise the source of the dark noise, we have developed a method for recording the membrane current of a single rod outer segment. The technique is based on that used by Neher and Sakmann 8 on muscle fibres.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)78-80
Number of pages3
JournalNature
Volume269
Issue number5623
DOIs
StatePublished - 1977

Fingerprint

Rod Cell Outer Segment
Anura
Light
Membranes
Darkness
Lighting
Noise
Observation
Ions
Muscles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Light-induced fluctuations in membrane current of single toad rod outer segments. / Yau, King-Wai; Lamb, T. D.; Baylor, D. A.

In: Nature, Vol. 269, No. 5623, 1977, p. 78-80.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yau, King-Wai ; Lamb, T. D. ; Baylor, D. A. / Light-induced fluctuations in membrane current of single toad rod outer segments. In: Nature. 1977 ; Vol. 269, No. 5623. pp. 78-80.
@article{71152616bc3f4983bddf6ff219a60666,
title = "Light-induced fluctuations in membrane current of single toad rod outer segments",
abstract = "VERTEBRATE photoreceptors respond to illumination with a reduction in the steady current of Na ions which in darkness flows inwards across the outer segment membrane; this results in hyperpolarisation of the cells1. The light responses of the receptors can be studied by measuring extracellular voltage gradients2 or by intracellular recording1, but these methods can only provide information averaged over many photoreceptors owing respectively to high extracellular conductivity and to the presence of electrical coupling between cells3-6. This averaging and the presence of dark voltage noise in photoreceptors6,7 have prevented observation of the electrical effects of individual photoisomerisations. To try to record these elementary events and to localise the source of the dark noise, we have developed a method for recording the membrane current of a single rod outer segment. The technique is based on that used by Neher and Sakmann 8 on muscle fibres.",
author = "King-Wai Yau and Lamb, {T. D.} and Baylor, {D. A.}",
year = "1977",
doi = "10.1038/269078a0",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "269",
pages = "78--80",
journal = "Nature",
issn = "0028-0836",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "5623",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Light-induced fluctuations in membrane current of single toad rod outer segments

AU - Yau, King-Wai

AU - Lamb, T. D.

AU - Baylor, D. A.

PY - 1977

Y1 - 1977

N2 - VERTEBRATE photoreceptors respond to illumination with a reduction in the steady current of Na ions which in darkness flows inwards across the outer segment membrane; this results in hyperpolarisation of the cells1. The light responses of the receptors can be studied by measuring extracellular voltage gradients2 or by intracellular recording1, but these methods can only provide information averaged over many photoreceptors owing respectively to high extracellular conductivity and to the presence of electrical coupling between cells3-6. This averaging and the presence of dark voltage noise in photoreceptors6,7 have prevented observation of the electrical effects of individual photoisomerisations. To try to record these elementary events and to localise the source of the dark noise, we have developed a method for recording the membrane current of a single rod outer segment. The technique is based on that used by Neher and Sakmann 8 on muscle fibres.

AB - VERTEBRATE photoreceptors respond to illumination with a reduction in the steady current of Na ions which in darkness flows inwards across the outer segment membrane; this results in hyperpolarisation of the cells1. The light responses of the receptors can be studied by measuring extracellular voltage gradients2 or by intracellular recording1, but these methods can only provide information averaged over many photoreceptors owing respectively to high extracellular conductivity and to the presence of electrical coupling between cells3-6. This averaging and the presence of dark voltage noise in photoreceptors6,7 have prevented observation of the electrical effects of individual photoisomerisations. To try to record these elementary events and to localise the source of the dark noise, we have developed a method for recording the membrane current of a single rod outer segment. The technique is based on that used by Neher and Sakmann 8 on muscle fibres.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0017410143&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0017410143&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/269078a0

DO - 10.1038/269078a0

M3 - Article

C2 - 408711

AN - SCOPUS:0017410143

VL - 269

SP - 78

EP - 80

JO - Nature

JF - Nature

SN - 0028-0836

IS - 5623

ER -