Life Science's Average Publishable Unit (APU) Has Increased over the Past Two Decades

Radames Cordero-Gonzalez, Carlos M. De León-Rodriguez, John K. Alvarado-Torres, Ana R. Rodriguez, Arturo Casadevall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Quantitative analysis of the scientific literature is important for evaluating the evolution and state of science. To study how the density of biological literature has changed over the past two decades we visually inspected 1464 research articles related only to the biological sciences from ten scholarly journals (with average Impact Factors, IF, ranging from 3.8 to 32.1). By scoring the number of data items (tables and figures), density of composite figures (labeled panels per figure or PPF), as well as the number of authors, pages and references per research publication we calculated an Average Publishable Unit or APU for 1993, 2003, and 2013. The data show an overall increase in the average ± SD number of data items from 1993 to 2013 of approximately 7±3to14±11 and PPF ratio of 2±1to4±2 per article, suggesting that the APU has doubled in size over the past two decades. As expected, the increase in data items per article is mainly in the form of supplemental material,constituting0 to 80% of the data items per publication in 2013, depending on the journal. The changes in the average number of pages (approx. 8±3to10±3), references (approx. 44±18 to 56 ±24) and authors (approx. 5±3 to8±9) per article are also presented and discussed. The average number of data items, figure density and authors per publication are correlated with the journal's average IF. The increasing APU size over time is important when considering the value of research articles for life scientists and publishers, as well as, the implications of these increasing trends in the mechanisms and economics of scientific communication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0156983
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

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Biological Science Disciplines
Publications
Research
Literature
communication (human)
quantitative analysis
Economics
Biological Sciences
economics
Communication
Composite materials
Chemical analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

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Life Science's Average Publishable Unit (APU) Has Increased over the Past Two Decades. / Cordero-Gonzalez, Radames; De León-Rodriguez, Carlos M.; Alvarado-Torres, John K.; Rodriguez, Ana R.; Casadevall, Arturo.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 11, No. 6, e0156983, 01.06.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cordero-Gonzalez, Radames ; De León-Rodriguez, Carlos M. ; Alvarado-Torres, John K. ; Rodriguez, Ana R. ; Casadevall, Arturo. / Life Science's Average Publishable Unit (APU) Has Increased over the Past Two Decades. In: PLoS One. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 6.
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