Lessons learned in developing a culturally adapted intervention for African-American families coping with parental cancer

Maureen P. Davey, Karni Kissil, Laura Lynch, La Rhonda Harmon, Nancy Hodgson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Prior clinical research supports the effectiveness of cancer support groups for cancer patients and their families, yet African-American families continue to be underrepresented in cancer support groups and in cancer clinical research studies. In order to fill this gap, we developed and evaluated a culturally adapted family support group for African-American families coping with parental cancer. We encountered unexpected challenges in overcoming barriers to recruitment, partnering with oncology providers, and building trust with the African-American community and African-American families coping with parental cancer. We describe actions taken during the two phases of this study and lessons learned along the way about recruiting and engaging African-American families in cancer support group studies, partnering with oncology providers, networking with the African-American community, and the importance of demonstrating cultural sensitivity to overcome the understandable historical legacy of mistrust.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)744-751
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012

Keywords

  • African-American families
  • Family intervention
  • Parental cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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