Less efficient G 2-M checkpoint is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer in African Americans

Yun Ling Zheng, Christopher A. Loffredo, Anthony J. Alberg, Zhipeng Yu, Raymond T. Jones, Donna Perlmutter, Lindsey Enewold, Mark J. Krasna, Rex Yung, Peter G. Shields, Curtis C. Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Cell cycle checkpoints play critical roles in the maintenance of genomic integrity. The inactivation of checkpoint genes by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms is frequent in all cancer types, as a less-efficient cell cycle control can lead to genetic instability and tumorigenesis. In an on-going case-control study consisting of 216 patients with non-small cell lung cancer, 226 population-based controls, and 114 hospital-based controls, we investigated the relationship of γ-radiation-induced G 2-M arrest and lung cancer risk. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were cultured for 90 hours, exposed to 1.0 Gy γ-radiation, and harvested at 3 hours after γ-radiation treatment. γ-Radiation-induced G 2-M arrest was measured as the percentage of mitotic cells in untreated cultures minus the percentage of mitotic cells in γ-radiation-treated cultures from the same subject. The mean percentage of γ-radiation-induced G 2-M arrest was significantly lower in cases than in population controls (1.18 versus 1.44, P <0.01) and hospital controls (1.18 versus 1.40, P = 0.01). When dichotomized at the 50th percentile value in combined controls (population and hospital controls), a lower level of γ-radiation-induced G 2-M arrest was associated with an increased risk of lung cancer among African Americans after adjusting for baseline mitotic index, age, gender, and pack-years of smoking [adjusted odd ratio (OR), 2.25; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.97-5.20]. A significant trend of an increased risk of lung cancer with a decreased level of G 2-M arrest was observed (P trend = 0.02) among African Americans, with a lowest-versus-highest quartile adjusted OR of 3.74 (95% CI, 0.98-14.3). This trend was most apparent among African American females (P trend <0.01), with a lowest-versus-highest quartile adjusted OR of 11.75 (95% CI, 1.47-94.04). The results suggest that a less-efficient DNA damage-induced G 2-M checkpoint is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer among African Americans. Interestingly, we observed a stronger association of DNA damage-induced G 2-M arrest and lung cancer among African Americans when compared with Caucasians. If replicated, these results may provide clues to the exceedingly high lung cancer incidence experienced by African Americans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9566-9573
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Research
Volume65
Issue number20
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2005

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African Americans
Lung Neoplasms
Radiation
Population Control
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Cell Cycle Checkpoints
DNA Damage
Radiation Dosage
Mitotic Index
Gene Silencing
Epigenomics
Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Case-Control Studies
Carcinogenesis
Smoking
Maintenance
Lymphocytes
Incidence
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Zheng, Y. L., Loffredo, C. A., Alberg, A. J., Yu, Z., Jones, R. T., Perlmutter, D., ... Harris, C. C. (2005). Less efficient G 2-M checkpoint is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer in African Americans. Cancer Research, 65(20), 9566-9573. https://doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-05-1003

Less efficient G 2-M checkpoint is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer in African Americans. / Zheng, Yun Ling; Loffredo, Christopher A.; Alberg, Anthony J.; Yu, Zhipeng; Jones, Raymond T.; Perlmutter, Donna; Enewold, Lindsey; Krasna, Mark J.; Yung, Rex; Shields, Peter G.; Harris, Curtis C.

In: Cancer Research, Vol. 65, No. 20, 15.10.2005, p. 9566-9573.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zheng, YL, Loffredo, CA, Alberg, AJ, Yu, Z, Jones, RT, Perlmutter, D, Enewold, L, Krasna, MJ, Yung, R, Shields, PG & Harris, CC 2005, 'Less efficient G 2-M checkpoint is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer in African Americans', Cancer Research, vol. 65, no. 20, pp. 9566-9573. https://doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-05-1003
Zheng, Yun Ling ; Loffredo, Christopher A. ; Alberg, Anthony J. ; Yu, Zhipeng ; Jones, Raymond T. ; Perlmutter, Donna ; Enewold, Lindsey ; Krasna, Mark J. ; Yung, Rex ; Shields, Peter G. ; Harris, Curtis C. / Less efficient G 2-M checkpoint is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer in African Americans. In: Cancer Research. 2005 ; Vol. 65, No. 20. pp. 9566-9573.
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