Lesions in many different spindle components activate the spindle checkpoint in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Kevin G. Hardwick, Rong Li, Cathy Mistrot, Rey Huei Chen, Phoebe Dann, Adam Rudner, Andrew W. Murray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The spindle checkpoint arrests cells in mitosis in response to defects in the assembly of the mitotic spindle or errors in chromosome alignment. We determined which spindle defects the checkpoint can detect by examining the interaction of mutations that compromise the checkpoint (mad1, mad2, and mad3) with those that damage various structural components of the spindle. Defects in microtubule polymerization, spindle pole body duplication, microtubule motors, and kinetochore components all activate the MAD-dependent checkpoint. In contrast, the cell cycle arrest caused by mutations that induce DNA damage (cdc13), inactivate the cyclin proteolysis machinery (cdc16 and cdc23), or arrest cells in anaphase (cdc15) is independent of the spindle checkpoint.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)509-518
Number of pages10
JournalGenetics
Volume152
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jun 1999
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Lesions in many different spindle components activate the spindle checkpoint in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this