Learning styles in two otolaryngology residency programs

Kulsoom Laeeq, Robert A. Weatherly, Alice Carrott, Vinciya Pandian, Charles W. Cummings, Nasir I. Bhatti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis: Kolb portrays four learning styles depending on how an individual grasps or transforms experience: accommodating, assimilating, diverging, and converging. Past studies in surgery, medicine, and anesthesia identified the predominant learning style in each of these specialties. The prevalence of different learning styles and existence of a predominant style, if any, has not been reported for otolaryngology residency programs. The purpose of our study was to determine if otolaryngology residents have a preferred learning style that is different from the predominant learning styles reported for other specialties. Study Design: We conducted a survey of the otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residents at two residency programs. Methods: Kolb's Learning Style Index (LSI) version 3.1 was administered to 46 residents from Johns Hopkins University and Kansas University Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery programs. LSI is a widely used 12-item questionnaire, with each item followed by four options. The subjects graded the options depending on how the options applied to them. Results: Forty-three otolaryngology residents completed the survey, with a response rate of 93.47%. The predominant learning style was converging (55.81%) followed by accommodating (18.61%), accounting for the learning styles of 74.42% of the total population. There were only 13.95% assimilating and 6.98% diverging learning styles. Two residents (4.65%) had their preference balanced across four learning styles. Conclusions: The predominant learning styles in otolaryngology were converging and accommodating, accounting for three fourths of the population. It would be desirable to modify our curriculum in a way that will optimize and facilitate learning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2360-2365
Number of pages6
JournalLaryngoscope
Volume119
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009

Keywords

  • Curricula
  • Education
  • Formative feedback
  • Learning styles
  • Residency training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

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