Law, ethics, and conversations between physicians and patients about firearms in the home

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Firearms in the home pose a risk to household members, including homicide, suicide, and unintentional deaths. Medical societies urge clinicians to counsel patients about those risks as part of sound medical practice. Depending on the circumstances, clinicians might recommend safe firearm storage, temporary removal of the firearm from the home, or other measures. Certain state firearm laws, however, might present legal and ethical challenges for physicians who counsel patients about guns in the home. Specifically, we discuss state background check laws for gun transfers, safe gun storage laws, and laws forbidding physicians from engaging in certain firearm-related conversations with their patients. Medical professionals should be aware of these and other state gun laws but should offer anticipatory guidance when clinically appropriate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)69-76
Number of pages8
JournalAMA Journal of Ethics
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Firearms
Ethics
conversation
moral philosophy
physician
state law
Physicians
Law
Marburger Bund
medical practice
homicide
suicide
death
Homicide
Medical Societies
Suicide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Law, ethics, and conversations between physicians and patients about firearms in the home. / McCourt, Alexander; Vernick, Jon S.

In: AMA Journal of Ethics, Vol. 20, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 69-76.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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