Lateral mass screw fixation in the cervical spine a systematic literature review

Jeffrey D. Coe, Alexander R. Vaccaro, Andrew T. Dailey, Richard Skolasky, Richard C. Sasso, Steven C. Ludwig, Erika D. Brodt, Joseph R. Dettori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Lateral mass screw fixation with plates or rods has become the standard method of posterior cervical spine fixation and stabilization for a variety of surgical indications. Despite ubiquitous usage, the safety and efficacy of this technique have not yet been established sufficiently to permit"on-label" U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for lateral mass screw fixation systems. The purpose of this study was to describe the safety profile and effectiveness of such systems when used in stabilizing the posterior cervical spine. Methods: A systematic search was conducted in MEDLINE and the Cochrane Collaboration Library for articles published from January 1, 1980, to December 1, 2011. We included all articles evaluating safety and/or clinical outcomes in adult patients undergoing posterior cervical subaxial fusion utilizing lateral mass instrumentation with plates or rods for degenerative disease (spondylosis), trauma, deformity, inflammatory disease, and revision surgery that satisfied our a priori inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results: Twenty articles (two retrospective comparative studies and eighteen case series) satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria and were included. Both of the comparative studies involved comparison of lateral mass screw fixation with wiring and indicated that the risk of complications was comparable between treatments (range, 0% to 7.1% compared with 0% to 6.3%, respectively). In one study, the fusion rate reported in the screw fixation group (100%) was similar to that in the wiring group (97%). Complication risks following lateral mass screw fixation were low across the eighteen case series. Nerve root injury attributed to screw placement occurred in 1.0% (95% confidence interval, 0.3% to 1.6%) of patients. No cases of vertebral artery injury were reported. Instrumentation complications such as screw or rod pullout, screw or plate breakage, and screw loosening occurred in

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2136-2143
Number of pages8
JournalThe Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume
Volume95
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 4 2013

Fingerprint

Spine
Safety
Wounds and Injuries
Spondylosis
Drug Approval
Vertebral Artery
Reoperation
MEDLINE
Libraries
Retrospective Studies
Confidence Intervals
Food
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Lateral mass screw fixation in the cervical spine a systematic literature review. / Coe, Jeffrey D.; Vaccaro, Alexander R.; Dailey, Andrew T.; Skolasky, Richard; Sasso, Richard C.; Ludwig, Steven C.; Brodt, Erika D.; Dettori, Joseph R.

In: The Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume, Vol. 95, No. 23, 04.12.2013, p. 2136-2143.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Coe, JD, Vaccaro, AR, Dailey, AT, Skolasky, R, Sasso, RC, Ludwig, SC, Brodt, ED & Dettori, JR 2013, 'Lateral mass screw fixation in the cervical spine a systematic literature review', The Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume, vol. 95, no. 23, pp. 2136-2143. https://doi.org/10.2106/JBJS.L.01522
Coe, Jeffrey D. ; Vaccaro, Alexander R. ; Dailey, Andrew T. ; Skolasky, Richard ; Sasso, Richard C. ; Ludwig, Steven C. ; Brodt, Erika D. ; Dettori, Joseph R. / Lateral mass screw fixation in the cervical spine a systematic literature review. In: The Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume. 2013 ; Vol. 95, No. 23. pp. 2136-2143.
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AU - Vaccaro, Alexander R.

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AU - Sasso, Richard C.

AU - Ludwig, Steven C.

AU - Brodt, Erika D.

AU - Dettori, Joseph R.

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