Latent growth models of the longitudinal effects of dementia caregiving: A comparison of African American and White family caregivers

David L Roth, William E. Haley, Jason E. Owen, Olivio J. Clay, Kathryn T. Goode

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Self-report measures of depression, physical health symptoms, and life satisfaction were collected over a 2-year period from 197 family caregivers of dementia patients and 218 noncaregivers (controls). Latent growth models were used to compare changes across time for African American and White caregivers, with gender, age, and socioeconomic status serving as covariates. Results indicated that White caregivers sustained higher levels of elevated depression and decreasing life satisfaction over time compared with African American caregivers. Both groups of caregivers reported increases in physical symptoms over time. These results indicate worsening difficulties over time for many White caregivers. African American caregivers show more resilience on measures of depression and life satisfaction but are still vulnerable to increases in physical symptoms over time. Implications for additional research and clinical intervention are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)427-436
Number of pages10
JournalPsychology and Aging
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

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African Americans
Caregivers
Dementia
Growth
Depression
Social Class
Self Report
Health
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Latent growth models of the longitudinal effects of dementia caregiving : A comparison of African American and White family caregivers. / Roth, David L; Haley, William E.; Owen, Jason E.; Clay, Olivio J.; Goode, Kathryn T.

In: Psychology and Aging, Vol. 16, No. 3, 2001, p. 427-436.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Roth, David L ; Haley, William E. ; Owen, Jason E. ; Clay, Olivio J. ; Goode, Kathryn T. / Latent growth models of the longitudinal effects of dementia caregiving : A comparison of African American and White family caregivers. In: Psychology and Aging. 2001 ; Vol. 16, No. 3. pp. 427-436.
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