Late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes in the Americas from 1999 to 2013

A trend analysis

Federico G. De Cosio, Safia Jiwani, Antonio Sanhueza, Patricia N. Soliz, Francisco Becerra-Posada, Marcos A. Espinal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Data on maternal deaths occurring after the 42 days postpartum reference time is scarce; the objective of this analysis is to explore the trend and magnitude of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes in the Americas between 1999 and 2013, and to recommend including these deaths in the monitoring of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Methods Exploratory data analysis enabled analyzing the magnitude and trend of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes for seven countries of the Americas: Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Cuba, Mexico and the United States. A Poisson regression model was developed to compare trends of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes between two periods of time: 1999 to 2005 and 2006 to 2013; and to estimate the relative increase of these deaths in the two periods of time. Findings The proportion of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes ranged between 2.40% (CI 0.85% ' 5.48%) and 18.68% (CI 17.06% ' 20.47%) in the seven countries. The ratio of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes per 100,000 live births has increased by two times in the region of the Americas in the period 2006-2013 compared to the period 1999-2005. The regional relative increase of late maternal death was 2.46 (p0.0001) times higher in the second period compared to the first. Interpretation Ascertainment of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes has improved in the Americas since the early 2000's due to improvements in the quality of information and the obstetric transition. Late and obstetric sequelae maternal deaths should be included in the monitoring of the SDGs as well as in the revision of the International Classification of Diseases' 11supth/sup version (ICD-11).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0160642
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Obstetrics
Maternal Death
complications (disease)
death
Conservation of Natural Resources
Sustainable development
Monitoring
Cuba
Colombia
Argentina
Live Birth
International Classification of Diseases
sustainable development
Quality Improvement
Mexico
Postpartum Period
Canada
Brazil

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes in the Americas from 1999 to 2013 : A trend analysis. / De Cosio, Federico G.; Jiwani, Safia; Sanhueza, Antonio; Soliz, Patricia N.; Becerra-Posada, Francisco; Espinal, Marcos A.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 11, No. 9, e0160642, 01.09.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

De Cosio, Federico G. ; Jiwani, Safia ; Sanhueza, Antonio ; Soliz, Patricia N. ; Becerra-Posada, Francisco ; Espinal, Marcos A. / Late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes in the Americas from 1999 to 2013 : A trend analysis. In: PLoS One. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 9.
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abstract = "Background Data on maternal deaths occurring after the 42 days postpartum reference time is scarce; the objective of this analysis is to explore the trend and magnitude of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes in the Americas between 1999 and 2013, and to recommend including these deaths in the monitoring of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Methods Exploratory data analysis enabled analyzing the magnitude and trend of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes for seven countries of the Americas: Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Cuba, Mexico and the United States. A Poisson regression model was developed to compare trends of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes between two periods of time: 1999 to 2005 and 2006 to 2013; and to estimate the relative increase of these deaths in the two periods of time. Findings The proportion of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes ranged between 2.40{\%} (CI 0.85{\%} ' 5.48{\%}) and 18.68{\%} (CI 17.06{\%} ' 20.47{\%}) in the seven countries. The ratio of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes per 100,000 live births has increased by two times in the region of the Americas in the period 2006-2013 compared to the period 1999-2005. The regional relative increase of late maternal death was 2.46 (p0.0001) times higher in the second period compared to the first. Interpretation Ascertainment of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes has improved in the Americas since the early 2000's due to improvements in the quality of information and the obstetric transition. Late and obstetric sequelae maternal deaths should be included in the monitoring of the SDGs as well as in the revision of the International Classification of Diseases' 11supth/sup version (ICD-11).",
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