Laser treatment of choroidal neovascularization in patients with angioid streaks

J. I. Lim, Neil M Bressler, M. J. Marsh, Susan B Bressler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The benefit of laser photocoagulation to choroidal neovascularization secondary to angioid streaks remains controversial. To further expand our knowledge, we reviewed the records of 20 patients (24 eyes) with classic (well-defined) choroidal neovascularization secondary to angioid streaks, who were treated with laser between 1982 and 1991 at the Retinal Vascular Center of the Wilmer Institute. The choroidal neovascularization was extrafoveal in 18 (75%), juxtafoveal in two, subfoveal in three, and indeterminate in one eye. Seventeen of the 24 fellow eyes (71%) had a disciform scar or choroidal neovascularization, or both. Follow-up ranged from three months to nine years (mean, 3.5 years; median, two years). Lines of visual acuity change averaged -2.5 at three, -2.6 at six, -2.4 at 12, and -4.8 lines at 24 months. Choroidal neovascularization persisted in five of 24 eyes and recurred in nine of the remaining 19 eyes at risk. When the fellow eye had choroidal neovascularization, scar, or both, at the time of treatment, the rate of persistence or recurrence was 65% vs 33% if the fellow eye had no choroidal neovascularization, scar, or both. An average of four lines of visual acuity was lost when fellow eyes had choroidal neovascularization, scar, or both, vs one line when the fellow eye had no choroidal neovascularization or scar. Laser photocoagulation of choroidal neovascularization in patients with angioid streaks can result in closure of the choroidal neovascularization and stabilization of visual acuity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)414-423
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume116
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

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Angioid Streaks
Choroidal Neovascularization
Lasers
Cicatrix
Therapeutics
Visual Acuity
Light Coagulation
Retinal Vessels

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Laser treatment of choroidal neovascularization in patients with angioid streaks. / Lim, J. I.; Bressler, Neil M; Marsh, M. J.; Bressler, Susan B.

In: American Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 116, No. 4, 1993, p. 414-423.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "The benefit of laser photocoagulation to choroidal neovascularization secondary to angioid streaks remains controversial. To further expand our knowledge, we reviewed the records of 20 patients (24 eyes) with classic (well-defined) choroidal neovascularization secondary to angioid streaks, who were treated with laser between 1982 and 1991 at the Retinal Vascular Center of the Wilmer Institute. The choroidal neovascularization was extrafoveal in 18 (75{\%}), juxtafoveal in two, subfoveal in three, and indeterminate in one eye. Seventeen of the 24 fellow eyes (71{\%}) had a disciform scar or choroidal neovascularization, or both. Follow-up ranged from three months to nine years (mean, 3.5 years; median, two years). Lines of visual acuity change averaged -2.5 at three, -2.6 at six, -2.4 at 12, and -4.8 lines at 24 months. Choroidal neovascularization persisted in five of 24 eyes and recurred in nine of the remaining 19 eyes at risk. When the fellow eye had choroidal neovascularization, scar, or both, at the time of treatment, the rate of persistence or recurrence was 65{\%} vs 33{\%} if the fellow eye had no choroidal neovascularization, scar, or both. An average of four lines of visual acuity was lost when fellow eyes had choroidal neovascularization, scar, or both, vs one line when the fellow eye had no choroidal neovascularization or scar. Laser photocoagulation of choroidal neovascularization in patients with angioid streaks can result in closure of the choroidal neovascularization and stabilization of visual acuity.",
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