Laparoscopic procurement model for living donor liver transplantation

Peter A. Pinto, Robert A. Montgomery, Bradley Ryan, William Roberts, Thomas Hsu, Parviz Kavoussi, A. S. Klein, Ernesto P. Molmenti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background/Aims: Noting the contribution to renal transplantation by the introduction of the laparoscopic approach to donor nephrectomy, we investigated the possibility of performing a laparoscopic hepatic lobe procurement with the goal of performing a live donor liver transplantation. We describe our technique and determine its feasibility for such a goal. Methods: The surgical technique was developed over a series of 12 adult female pigs and adapted in two human cadavers. The technique included pneumoperitoneum with CO2, mobilization of the liver, and transection of the parenchyma into right and left lobes with a laparoscopic cavitron ultrasonic aspirator. The vascular inflow and outflow structures (hepatic artery, portal vein, hepatic veins) of the anatomical specimen being procured were preserved undisturbed during the hepatic transection. No temporary vascular occlusion techniques were utilized. The vascular structures were stapled and sectioned just prior to removal of the specimen. Results: Hepatic lobectomies were successfully performed laparoscopically. Vascular and biliary structures were preserved to allow for subsequent transplantation. Operative time from establishment of pneumoperitoneum to lobe procurement was under 4 h. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility of laparoscopic living donor procurement for liver transplantation, from both a technical and a physiological perspective.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-43
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Transplantation
Volume17
Issue numberSUPPL. 9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003

Keywords

  • Laparoscopy
  • Liver donors
  • Liver resection
  • Liver transplantation
  • Minimally invasive surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

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