Language-Related ERP Components

Tamara Y. Swaab, Kerry LeDoux, C. Christine Camblin, Megan A. Boudewyn

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Understanding the processes that permit us to extract meaning from spoken or written linguistic input requires elucidating how, when, and where in the brain sentences and stories, syllables and words are analyzed. Because human language is a cognitive function that is not readily investigated using neuroscience approaches in animal models, this task presents special challenges. In this chapter, we describe how event-related potentials (ERPs) have contributed to the understanding of language processes as they unfold in real-time. We will provide an overview of the many ERPs that have been used in language research, and will discuss the main models of what these ERPs reflect in terms of linguistic and neural processes. In addition, using examples from the literature, we will illustrate how ERPs can be used to study language comprehension, and will also outline methodological issues that are specific to using ERPs in language research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Oxford Handbook of Event-Related Potential Components
PublisherOxford University Press
ISBN (Print)9780199940356, 9780195374148
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 18 2012

Fingerprint

Evoked Potentials
Language
Linguistics
Neurosciences
Research
Cognition
Animal Models
Brain

Keywords

  • Discourse processing
  • Event-related potentials
  • Lexical processing
  • N400
  • Non-literal language
  • Nref
  • P600
  • Sentence processing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Swaab, T. Y., LeDoux, K., Camblin, C. C., & Boudewyn, M. A. (2012). Language-Related ERP Components. In The Oxford Handbook of Event-Related Potential Components Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195374148.013.0197

Language-Related ERP Components. / Swaab, Tamara Y.; LeDoux, Kerry; Camblin, C. Christine; Boudewyn, Megan A.

The Oxford Handbook of Event-Related Potential Components. Oxford University Press, 2012.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Swaab, TY, LeDoux, K, Camblin, CC & Boudewyn, MA 2012, Language-Related ERP Components. in The Oxford Handbook of Event-Related Potential Components. Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195374148.013.0197
Swaab TY, LeDoux K, Camblin CC, Boudewyn MA. Language-Related ERP Components. In The Oxford Handbook of Event-Related Potential Components. Oxford University Press. 2012 https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195374148.013.0197
Swaab, Tamara Y. ; LeDoux, Kerry ; Camblin, C. Christine ; Boudewyn, Megan A. / Language-Related ERP Components. The Oxford Handbook of Event-Related Potential Components. Oxford University Press, 2012.
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