Language disorder predicts familial Alzheimer's disease

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The presence of aphasia or agraphia easily detectable by a standard history and clinical examination of SDAT patients predicts a high risk of dementia in the parents and sibs of those patients. The appearance of dementia in about 50% of parents and sibs, regardless of sex, is compatible with autosomal dominant inheritance. Familial Alzheimer's disease is a clinicopathologic entity characterized by a dementia syndrome with prominent aphasia and agraphia. We suggest that it is an autosomal dominant disorder of complete but age-dependent penetrance and that this entity is the most frequent cause of dementia seen in clinical practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationJohns Hopkins Medical Journal
Pages145-147
Number of pages3
Volume149
Edition4
StatePublished - 1981

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Language Disorders
Dementia
Alzheimer Disease
Agraphia
Aphasia
Parents
Penetrance
History

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Folstein, M. F., & Breitner, J. C. S. (1981). Language disorder predicts familial Alzheimer's disease. In Johns Hopkins Medical Journal (4 ed., Vol. 149, pp. 145-147)

Language disorder predicts familial Alzheimer's disease. / Folstein, Marshal F.; Breitner, John C.S.

Johns Hopkins Medical Journal. Vol. 149 4. ed. 1981. p. 145-147.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Folstein, MF & Breitner, JCS 1981, Language disorder predicts familial Alzheimer's disease. in Johns Hopkins Medical Journal. 4 edn, vol. 149, pp. 145-147.
Folstein MF, Breitner JCS. Language disorder predicts familial Alzheimer's disease. In Johns Hopkins Medical Journal. 4 ed. Vol. 149. 1981. p. 145-147
Folstein, Marshal F. ; Breitner, John C.S. / Language disorder predicts familial Alzheimer's disease. Johns Hopkins Medical Journal. Vol. 149 4. ed. 1981. pp. 145-147
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