Lactation history, serum concentrations of persistent organic pollutants, and maternal risk of diabetes

Geng Zong, Philippe Grandjean, Xiaobin Wang, Qi Sun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective Lactation may help curb diabetes risk and is also known as an excretion route for some environmental pollutants. We evaluated associations of lifetime lactation history with serum concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2006, and examined whether potentially diabetogenic POPs account for associations between lactation and diabetes. Research design and methods Among 4479 parous women, breastfeeding history was defined as the number of children breastfed ≥1 month. Diabetes was identified by self-report or hemoglobin A1c >6.5%. Twenty-four POPs were measured in serum among subsamples of 668 to 1073 participants. Results Compared with women without lactation history, odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of having diabetes among those with 1–2 and ≥3 lactation periods were 0.83(0.61, 1.13) and 0.63(0.44, 0.91; P trend=0.03). Lifetime lactation history was inversely associated with serum concentrations of 17 out of the 24 organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl congeners (PCBs), and perfluoroalkyl substances (Ptrend

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)282-288
Number of pages7
JournalEnvironmental Research
Volume150
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

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lactation
diabetes
Organic pollutants
Medical problems
Lactation
serum
Mothers
history
Serum
Curbs
Environmental Pollutants
Polychlorinated Biphenyls
Nutrition
Pesticides
breastfeeding
health and nutrition
Hemoglobins
Nutrition Surveys
Health
hemoglobin

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Lactation
  • Persistent organic pollutant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Lactation history, serum concentrations of persistent organic pollutants, and maternal risk of diabetes. / Zong, Geng; Grandjean, Philippe; Wang, Xiaobin; Sun, Qi.

In: Environmental Research, Vol. 150, 01.10.2016, p. 282-288.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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