Laboratory Measures of Alcohol (Ethanol) Consumption: Strategies to Assess Drinking Patterns with Biochemical Measures

Marilyn Sawyer Sommers, Christine Savage, Janet Wray, Janice M. Dyehouse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Alcohol (ethanol) use is a global, health-related problem that spans a continuum ranging from low-risk, at-risk, and problem drinking to alcohol dependence and chronic abuse. Clinicians and researchers alike have the need to quantify drinking patterns to determine the risk for adverse, health-related events such as injury, liver damage, and cancer. Biochemical measures of ethanol consumption are affected by temporal patterns of drinking as well as individual characteristics such as gender and age. The choice of a laboratory analysis to determine ethanol consumption is complex; no single laboratory test will predict drinking accurately across all drinking patterns, across the life span, and across gender. In conjunction with interviews and physical assessment, however, biochemical laboratory tests are sensitive tools used to measure both recent and long-term patterns of alcohol consumption.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)203-217
Number of pages15
JournalBiological Research For Nursing
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2003
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • alcohol
  • alcohol consumption
  • biochemical indicators
  • drinking patterns
  • ethanol

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Research and Theory

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Laboratory Measures of Alcohol (Ethanol) Consumption: Strategies to Assess Drinking Patterns with Biochemical Measures'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this