Laboratory evaluation of urinary tract infections in an ambulatory clinic

Karen C Carroll, D. C. Hale, D. H. Von Boerum, G. C. Reich, L. T. Hamilton, J. M. Matsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A 4-month evaluation of ambulatory patients with a suspicion of a urinary tract infection was performed. Specific objectives included assessment of five urinary screening methods, reevaluation of the necessity of the phenylethyl alcohol plate (PEA), and cost-effectiveness of screening for low colony count bacteriuria. Urine samples were collected as midstream, clean- caught specimens. A total of 142 samples, 87 from 79 symptomatic patients and 55 negative controls, were evaluated. All urine specimens were cultured using a 0.01 mL loop and a 0.001 mL loop onto Columbia sheep blood agar, MacConkey agar, and PEA agar. Twenty-four specimens (17%) were sterile, 64 (45%) were contaminated, and 54 (38%) were infected. Five urine screening methods were performed. These tests and their associated sensitivity and specificity are as follows. The Chemstrip 9 (Behring, Inc., Somerville, NJ) for leukocyte esterase and nitrate, 67%, 98%; microscopic analysis on spun urine, 79%, 93%; methylene blue stain for pyuria, 60%, 99%; Gram stain for pyuria, 45%, 93%; Gram stain for bacteriuria, 65%, 75%; and the URISCREEN (Analytab Products, Plainview, NY), 92%, 89%. Inclusion of a PEA plate for isolation of gram- positive organisms provided no additional information. Routine culture of urine samples at 10-2 mL increased the contamination rate by 19%.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)100-103
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Pathology
Volume101
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Urinary Tract Infections
Phenylethyl Alcohol
Urine
Pyuria
Agar
Bacteriuria
Methylene Blue
Nitrates
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Sheep
Coloring Agents
Sensitivity and Specificity
Gram's stain

Keywords

  • Urinary tract infections
  • Urine screening tests

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Carroll, K. C., Hale, D. C., Von Boerum, D. H., Reich, G. C., Hamilton, L. T., & Matsen, J. M. (1994). Laboratory evaluation of urinary tract infections in an ambulatory clinic. American Journal of Clinical Pathology, 101(1), 100-103.

Laboratory evaluation of urinary tract infections in an ambulatory clinic. / Carroll, Karen C; Hale, D. C.; Von Boerum, D. H.; Reich, G. C.; Hamilton, L. T.; Matsen, J. M.

In: American Journal of Clinical Pathology, Vol. 101, No. 1, 1994, p. 100-103.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carroll, KC, Hale, DC, Von Boerum, DH, Reich, GC, Hamilton, LT & Matsen, JM 1994, 'Laboratory evaluation of urinary tract infections in an ambulatory clinic', American Journal of Clinical Pathology, vol. 101, no. 1, pp. 100-103.
Carroll KC, Hale DC, Von Boerum DH, Reich GC, Hamilton LT, Matsen JM. Laboratory evaluation of urinary tract infections in an ambulatory clinic. American Journal of Clinical Pathology. 1994;101(1):100-103.
Carroll, Karen C ; Hale, D. C. ; Von Boerum, D. H. ; Reich, G. C. ; Hamilton, L. T. ; Matsen, J. M. / Laboratory evaluation of urinary tract infections in an ambulatory clinic. In: American Journal of Clinical Pathology. 1994 ; Vol. 101, No. 1. pp. 100-103.
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