Korean American Storeowners’ Perceived Barriers and Motivators for Implementing a Corner Store-Based Program

Hee Jung Song, Joel Gittelsohn, Miyong Kim, Sonali Suratkar, Sangita Sharma, Jean Anliker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Based on substantial formative research, the authors developed and implemented a year-long corner store-based program in East Baltimore focusing on Korean American (KA) stores. To understand acceptability of the intervention by storeowners, the authors examined the motivating factors for program participation, barriers to program implementation, perceived effectiveness of intervention materials, and perceptions about the program. Data collection methods included in-depth interviews with seven corner store owners, field notes by interventionists, and a follow-up survey. Stores varied considerably in terms of owners’ perceptions about the program, supportive atmosphere, and acceptability of intervention strategies. The storeowners who showed strong or moderate support for the program were more likely to sustain the stocking of promoted foods such as cooking spray and baked or low-fat chips after the program was completed as compared to less supportive stores. The level of support and active participation of storeowners can greatly influence the success of corner store-based nutrition interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)472-482
Number of pages11
JournalHealth promotion practice
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011

Keywords

  • Korean American merchants
  • corner stores
  • nutrition intervention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Nursing (miscellaneous)

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