Knowledge, attitudes and practices related to avian influenza among poultry workers in Nepal

A cross sectional study

Dinesh Neupane, Vishnu Khanal, Kamal Ghimire, Arja R. Aro, Anja Leppin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Avian influenza is a considerable threat to global public health. Prevention and control depend on awareness and protective behaviours of the general population as well as high risk-groups. This study aims to explore the knowledge, attitudes and practices related to avian influenza among poultry workers in Nepal.Methods: The study was based on a cross-sectional study design, using a structured questionnaire administered in face-to-face interviews with 96 poultry workers age 15 and above from the Rupandehi district in Nepal.Results: The majority of respondents were male (80%), mean age was 35 (SD = 11.6). Nearly everybody was aware that AI cases had been detected in Nepal and that poultry workers were at risk for infection. The major sources of AI information were radio, TV and newspapers. Knowledge about preventive measures was high with regard to some behaviours (hand washing), but medium to low with regard to others (using cleaning and disinfecting procedures or protective clothing). Poultry workers who got their information from TV and newspapers and those who were more afraid of contracting AI had higher knowledge than those who did not. Being employed as compared to being an owner of a poultry farm as well as having a high level of knowledge was associated with practising more preventive behaviours. While on one hand many specific government control measures found a high degree of acceptance, a majority of study participants also thought that government control and compensation measures as a whole were insufficient.Conclusions: The study provides information about knowledge and practices regarding avian influenza among poultry workers in Nepal. It highlights the importance of targeting lack of knowledge as well as structural-material barriers to successfully build preparedness for a major outbreak situation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number76
JournalBMC Infectious Diseases
Volume12
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 30 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Nepal
Influenza in Birds
Poultry
Cross-Sectional Studies
Newspapers
Protective Clothing
Hand Disinfection
Radio
Disease Outbreaks
Public Health
Interviews
Infection
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Knowledge, attitudes and practices related to avian influenza among poultry workers in Nepal : A cross sectional study. / Neupane, Dinesh; Khanal, Vishnu; Ghimire, Kamal; Aro, Arja R.; Leppin, Anja.

In: BMC Infectious Diseases, Vol. 12, 76, 30.03.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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