Knowledge about vaccines and willingness to participate in preventive HIV vaccine trials: A population-based study, Rakai, Uganda

Noah Kiwanuka, Merlin Robb, Godfrey Kigozi, Deborah Birx, James Philips, Fred Wabwire-Mangen, Maria J Wawer, Fred Nalugoda, Nelson K. Sewankambo, David Serwadda, Ronald H Gray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to assess knowledge and beliefs regarding vaccines and willingness to participate in HIV vaccine trials. A baseline survey assessed knowledge and attitudes toward vaccination and potential HIV vaccines among 14,177 participants aged 15-49 years, in a population cohort. Willingness to participate in HIV-preventive vaccine trials was assessed during a follow-up survey 10 months later after providing community education on HIV vaccines. Knowledge of the preventive utility of vaccines was high (71%), but higher in men than women (P <0.001), and increased with education levels (P <0.001). Vaccines were considered appropriate for children and women (99 and 88%, respectively), but not for adult men (28%). Participants felt that adolescents were the most appropriate subjects for HIV preventive vaccine trials (93.7%) but also thought that HIV-positive persons were eligible for trials (60.2%), and only 20% thought a preventive vaccine could help control HIV. HIV vaccine awareness increased from 68% at baseline to 81% at follow-up (P <0.001). Willingness to participate in HIV-preventive vaccine trials was 77%. Vaccine knowledge and willingness to participate in trials are high in this population. However, there still is need for education on the potential role of preventive HIV vaccines in the control of the epidemic and the importance of vaccination for men, especially in the context of an HIV vaccine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)721-725
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2004

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AIDS Vaccines
Uganda
Vaccines
Population
Education
Vaccination
HIV

Keywords

  • HIV vaccines
  • Rakai
  • Vaccines
  • Willingness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Immunology

Cite this

Knowledge about vaccines and willingness to participate in preventive HIV vaccine trials : A population-based study, Rakai, Uganda. / Kiwanuka, Noah; Robb, Merlin; Kigozi, Godfrey; Birx, Deborah; Philips, James; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Wawer, Maria J; Nalugoda, Fred; Sewankambo, Nelson K.; Serwadda, David; Gray, Ronald H.

In: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, Vol. 36, No. 2, 01.06.2004, p. 721-725.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kiwanuka, Noah ; Robb, Merlin ; Kigozi, Godfrey ; Birx, Deborah ; Philips, James ; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred ; Wawer, Maria J ; Nalugoda, Fred ; Sewankambo, Nelson K. ; Serwadda, David ; Gray, Ronald H. / Knowledge about vaccines and willingness to participate in preventive HIV vaccine trials : A population-based study, Rakai, Uganda. In: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. 2004 ; Vol. 36, No. 2. pp. 721-725.
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