Knowledge about emergency contraception among family-planning providers in urban Ghana

Andreea A. Creanga, Hilary M. Schwandt, Kwabena A. Danso, Amy O. Tsui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To assess the theoretical and practical knowledge about emergency contraception (EC) among family-planning (FP) providers in Ghana and to examine the association between FP providers' theoretical and practical knowledge. Methods: Data on 600 FP providers were collected through a census of facilities offering FP services in Kumasi, Ghana, in 2008. Nested linear multivariate regression analysis was used to identify sociodemographic, facility-related, and work-related variables associated with FP providers' theoretical and practical knowledge about EC. Results: On average, FP providers gave 4.1 correct answers to the 11 questions assessing theoretical knowledge and 5.6 correct answers to the 8 questions assessing their practical ability to provide EC. The FP providers seemed to learn provision-related aspects through practice without having a particularly good theoretical knowledge on EC as a contraceptive method. The health sector in which FP providers worked, their education and having received EC-specific training, the number of services offered, and the number of women seen during a week were all significant correlates of both theoretical and practical knowledge about EC. The 2 knowledge domains were significantly and positively associated. Conclusion: There is need to improve knowledge about EC among FP providers in Ghana through in-service training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)64-68
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics
Volume114
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2011

Keywords

  • Emergency contraception
  • Family planning
  • Ghana
  • Providers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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