Knowing what the brain is seeing in three dimensions: A novel, noninvasive, sensitive, accurate, and low-noise technique for measuring ocular torsion

Jorge Otero-Millan, Dale C. Roberts, Adrian Lasker, David Samuel Zee, Amir Kheradmand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Torsional eye movements are rotations of the eye around the line of sight. Measuring torsion is essential to understanding how the brain controls eye position and how it creates a veridical perception of object orientation in three dimensions. Torsion is also important for diagnosis of many vestibular, neurological, and ophthalmological disorders. Currently, there are multiple devices and methods that produce reliable measurements of horizontal and vertical eye movements. Measuring torsion, however, noninvasively and reliably has been a longstanding challenge, with previous methods lacking real-time capabilities or suffering from intrusive artifacts. We propose a novel method for measuring eye movements in three dimensions using modern computer vision software (OpenCV) and concepts of iris recognition. To measure torsion, we use template matching of the entire iris and automatically account for occlusion of the iris and pupil by the eyelids. The current setup operates binocularly at 100 Hz with noise

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number11
JournalJournal of Vision
Volume15
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Iris
Eye Movements
Noise
Brain
Eyelids
Pupil
Nervous System Diseases
Artifacts
Software
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Eye tracking
  • Listing's law
  • Torsional eye movements
  • Vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems

Cite this

Knowing what the brain is seeing in three dimensions : A novel, noninvasive, sensitive, accurate, and low-noise technique for measuring ocular torsion. / Otero-Millan, Jorge; Roberts, Dale C.; Lasker, Adrian; Zee, David Samuel; Kheradmand, Amir.

In: Journal of Vision, Vol. 15, No. 14, 11, 2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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