Klebsiella-Enterobacter at Boston City Hospital, 1967

Peter E. Dans, Frederick F. Barrett, John I. Casey, Maxwell Finland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study of 170 strains of Klebsiella-Enterobacter isolated at Boston City Hospital in 1967 confirmed most but not all observations made in 1963-1964 on the bacteriologic and epidemiologic characteristics and antibiotic susceptibility of this group of organisms. Klebsiella type 24 remained endemic and the most frequent serotype, but in 1967 type 2 strains were almost as frequent. Most type 24 strains were isolated from patients in surgical wards; patients with type 2 were more widely scattered. Both were frequently associated with instrumentation (mostly urinary catheters). Type 26 was endemic to the nurseries. Kanamycin sulfate resistance was more frequent in 1967, but two thirds of the strains were still sensitive. Resistance to polymyxin B sulfate was similar in the two studies. Nearly all strains were highly sensitive to gentamicin sulfate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)94-101
Number of pages8
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume125
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1970
Externally publishedYes

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Enterobacter
Klebsiella
Urban Hospitals
Kanamycin Resistance
Polymyxin B
Urinary Catheters
Kanamycin
Nurseries
Gentamicins
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Serogroup

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Klebsiella-Enterobacter at Boston City Hospital, 1967. / Dans, Peter E.; Barrett, Frederick F.; Casey, John I.; Finland, Maxwell.

In: Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 125, No. 1, 1970, p. 94-101.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dans, Peter E. ; Barrett, Frederick F. ; Casey, John I. ; Finland, Maxwell. / Klebsiella-Enterobacter at Boston City Hospital, 1967. In: Archives of Internal Medicine. 1970 ; Vol. 125, No. 1. pp. 94-101.
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