Job and industry classifications associated with sarcoidosis in a case-control etiologic study of sarcoidosis (ACCESS)

Juliana Barnard, Cecile Rose, Lee Newman, Martha Canner, John Martyny, Chuck McCammon, Eddy Bresnitz, Milt Rossman, Bruce Thompson, Benjamin Rybicki, Steven E. Weinberger, David R. Moller, Geoffrey McLennan, Gary Hunninghake, Louis DePalo, Robert P. Baughman, Michael C. Iannuzzi, Marc A. Judson, Genell L. Knatterud, Alvin S. TeirsteinHenry Yeager, Carol J. Johns, David L. Rabin, Reuben Cherniack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether specific occupations and industries may be associated with sarcoidosis. Methods: A Case Control Etiologic Study of Sarcoidosis (ACCESS) obtained occupational and environmental histories on 706 newly diagnosed sarcoidosis cases and matched controls. We used Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) and Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) to assess occupational contributions to sarcoidosis risk. Results: Univariable analysis identified elevated risk of sarcoidosis for workers with industrial organic dust exposures, especially in Caucasian workers. Workers for suppliers of building materials, hardware, and gardening materials were at an increased risk of sarcoidosis as were educators. Work providing childcare was negatively associated with sarcoidosis risk. Jobs with metal dust or metal fume, exposures were negatively associated with sarcoidosis risk, especially in Caucasian workers. Conclusions: In this study, we found that exposures in particular occupational setting may contribute to sarcoidosis risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)226-234
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of occupational and environmental medicine
Volume47
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Job and industry classifications associated with sarcoidosis in a case-control etiologic study of sarcoidosis (ACCESS)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this